Posts Tagged ‘ Yoshiaki Onishi

Quatuor Diotima to perform in two concerts, present world premiere during residency at University of Missouri

The internationally acclaimed group Quatuor Diotima is coming to the University of Missouri for a residency that will include two performances and the world premiere of a new commissioned work composed by Mizzou post-doctoral fellow Yoshiaki Onishi.

Formed in 1996 by graduates of the Paris National Conservatory, Quatuor Diotima (pictured) is a string quartet that performs contemporary classical music and offers a fresh look at works by the great composers. The quartet’s members are violinists Yun-Peng Zhao and Constance Ronzatti, violist Franck Chevalier, and cellist Pierre Morlet.

They will perform at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, February 20 at Whitmore Recital Hall on the Mizzou campus, presenting a program that will include music by Beethoven and Alban Berg in addition to Onishi’s “String Quartet No. 2,” which was written with a commission from the Fromm Music Foundation. Admission to the concert is free and open to the public.

The quartet will conclude their residency with a concert at 7:00 p.m. Saturday, February 22 at First Baptist Church, 1112 E Broadway, performing works by Berg and Bartók and teaming up with Mizzou’s Esterhazy Quartet for the rarely heard Shostakovich Octet.

Tickets for Saturday’s concert, which is a co-presentation of the Mizzou New Music Initiative and the Odyssey Chamber Music Series, are $20 for general admission, $10 for students with ID, free for children under 12, and can be purchased online at https://www.odysseymissouri.org/tickets.html.

During their residency on campus, Quatuor Diotima also will read works by student composers; coach the members of the Mizzou New Music Ensemble; and make a recording of Onishi’s new quartet.

Named after a work by Italian avant garde composer Luigi Nono, Quatuor Diotima has toured the United States, Asia, Australia, and South America and performed at major European festivals and venues, such as the Berlin Philharmonie, Berlin Konzerthaus, Reina Sofia in Madrid, Cité de la musique in Paris, Wigmore Hall and SouthBank Centre in London, the Vienna Konzerthaus, and more.

Quatuor Diotima has worked with major composers including Pierre Boulez, Helmut Lachenmann, Toshio Hosokawa, and Brian Ferneyhough, and have commissioned new works from composers Gérard Pesson, Alberto Posadas, Oscar Bianchi, James Dillon, Miroslav Srnka, Rebecca Saunders, Pascal Dusapin, Tristan Murail, and more. They also have won several international competitions, and have recorded for NEOS, Kairos, Alpha Productions, ECM, and Naïve.

Bret Bohman named 2019 MTNA Distinguished Composer of the Year

The Music Teachers National Association (MTNA) has named Bret Bohman as the 2019 MTNA Distinguished Composer of Year.

Bohman (pictured) teaches courses in electronic music composition and music theory at the University of Missouri. He is a co-founder of the new music group Khemia Ensemble, and also records original electronic music under the name Bels Lontano. Bohman previously taught at the University of Michigan, where he received his doctorate.

The MTNA award is given to the composer of the most significant work from among all compositions commissioned during the year by the organization’s state affiliates, and represents “a significant, noteworthy recognition by your peers of your extraordinary skills as a composer.”

Bohman and his composition “Tides,” for clarinet and electronics, were selected by a panel of independent judges from among 30 works created in 2019. The judges for the year were Dr. Benjamin Krause, an Emmy nominated composer and winner of the 2018 MTNA Distinguished Composer of Year; Dr. Andrew Nishikawa, instructor at the Art Institutes in Houston, TX; and Cody Criswell, composer, percussionist and guitarist.

The award comes with a $5,000 cash prize and a performance of the winning work, which will feature Mizzou’s post-doctoral fellow Yoshiaki Onishi as the clarinet soloist, during the 2020 MTNA National Conference, to be held March 21 – 25 in Chicago, IL.

 

Mizzou New Music Ensemble to perform works from Missouri, South America, and more on Sunday, November 17 at Whitmore Recital Hall

The Mizzou New Music Ensemble will offer new music from Missouri, South America, and more in concert at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, November 17 at Whitmore Recital Hall on the University of Missouri campus in Columbia. The concert is free and open to the public.

From close to home, the Ensemble (pictured) will perform the two winning works written for the 2019 Missouri Association of Departments and Schools of Music (MADSM) Collegiate Composition Competition.

“Cadencia” was composed by Truman State University student Samuel Tillman, the 2019 winner in the undergraduate category winner, and “Hitt Street Harangue” is by Daniel Vega, a master’s student in composition at Mizzou and this year’s graduate winner. Both works were selected in a competitive judging process open to all student composers enrolled at MADSM member institutions.

The concert also will include two works from South American composers that will be featured when the Ensemble tours that continent in May, 2020. “I come from afar” was composed by Sofia Scheps, who teaches at the Escuela Universitaria de Música in Montevideo, Uruguay; and “Expansion” is by Patricia Martínez, a composer, pianist and professor of composition at the National University of Quilmes in Buenos Aires, Argentina. During the tour, both composers will host concerts by the Ensemble at their respective institutions.

In addition to those four compositions, assistant conductor Yoshi Onishi will lead the Ensemble in a performance of “Talea” by French composer Gérard Grisey. Considered a late-20th-century classic, it alternates “between ferocity and quietude,” so as to – in the composer’s words – “express two aspects or, more precisely, two auditory angles of a single phenomenon.”

Two more new pieces of music from Missouri will complete the program. “Love Is Love, The Pedro Zamora Story” was composed by Daniel Vega originally for a film soundtrack; and “Pentatonic Sonata” is by Harry Tyrer, a retired Mizzou engineering professor now studying composition with Mizzou’s Carolina Heredia.

The seven-member Mizzou New Music Ensemble is made up of University of Missouri graduate students under the direction of Stefan Freund, a cellist, composer, conductor, professor of composition, and artistic director of the Mizzou New Music Initiative.

The Ensemble’s members for the 2019-20 season are Daniel Fitzpatrick, piano; Stephen Landy, percussion; Ann Mozina, flute; Jordan Nielsen, percussion; Pedro Ramiro, violin; Cameron Tubbs, cello; and Andrew Wiele, clarinet. Mizzou New Music Initiative post-doctoral fellow Yoshiaki Onishi serves as the Ensemble’s assistant conductor.

Mizzou New Music Ensemble to perform works by Boulez, Higdon, Martínez, and Heredia in concert Sunday, October 6 at Whitmore Recital Hall

The Mizzou New Music Ensemble will begin their 2019-20 season with a concert featuring works by two modern masters, a Mizzou alumnus, and a current Mizzou faculty member.

The Ensemble (pictured) will perform music by Pierre Boulez, Jennifer Higdon, José Martínez, and Carolina Heredia at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, October 6 at Whitmore Recital Hall on the University of Missouri campus in Columbia. The concert is free and open to the public.

As the name suggests, Boulez’s “Dérive 1” is derived from two of his other compositions, “Messagesquisse” and “Répons,” the latter of which in turn was created as a re-elaboration of musical ideas from “Éclat/Multiples.” This working method was typical of Boulez, who was known for producing new material by extending or transforming existing pieces.

Higdon’s “Zaka” has been called “an energetic and tightly focused work that uses string instruments in percussive and unorthodox ways,” and was praised by the Sacramento Bee as “a fantastic sprint full of irresistible Stravinskian energy and rhythmic drive.”

Martínez, who earned his master’s degree in composition from Mizzou in 2016, describes his piece “Illegal Cycles” as “an attempt to contaminate salsa with some noise, yet at the same time, to look for the groove in the fine-art sound of the freely improvised music” and “a natural product of our post-postmodern world, where the artistic boundaries between genres are happily long gone.”

“Ius in Bello” (Latin for “law of war”) was inspired by the socio-political confrontations in Venezuela that began in 2014. Heredia, a native of Argentina and an assistant professor of composition at Mizzou, calls the work “my response to the violent repression executed by the government against civilian protesters,” explaining that it “engages with dream-like sections in which color-saturated imagery of a perfect future is tinted with crispy dissonances.”

The seven-member Mizzou New Music Ensemble is made up of University of Missouri graduate students under the direction of Stefan Freund, a cellist, composer, conductor, professor of composition, and artistic director of the Mizzou New Music Initiative.

The Ensemble’s members for the 2019-20 season are Daniel Fitzpatrick, piano; Stephen Landy, percussion; Ann Mozina, flute; Jordan Nielsen, percussion; Pedro Ramiro, violin; Cameron Tubbs, cello; and Andrew Wiele, clarinet. Mizzou New Music Initiative post-doctoral fellow Yoshiaki Onishi serves as the Ensemble’s assistant conductor.

A look back at the 2019 Mizzou International Composers Festival

Composers Festival spotlight: Mizzou New Music Ensemble

Occupying their usual spot in the festival lineup, the Mizzou New Music Ensemble will be performing during the 2019 Mizzou International Composers Festival as part of Friday night’s “Mizzou New Music” concert at the Missouri Theatre.

Their portion of the evening’s program will include works by the MICF’s two distinguished guest composers – “The Blotting” by Donnacha Dennehy and “World Under Glass No. 2” by Amy Beth Kirsten – as well as music by Mizzou student Jack Snelling.

The Mizzou New Music Ensemble (pictured) is made up of University of Missouri graduate students under the direction of Stefan Freund, professor of composition and artistic director of the Mizzou New Music Initiative and the MICF. The Ensemble serves as the repertory group for MNMI, working with faculty, students, and visiting composers, and giving public performances on campus and in the community.

In addition to presenting several concerts each year in Columbia, the Ensemble also has performed programs of works by Mizzou composers at the Contemporary Art Museum – St. Louis, the St. Louis Zoo, the St. Louis Science Center, Forest Park, the World Chess Hall of Fame, Cortex Innovation Community, and more.

The Ensemble’s current members are Hannah Hutchins, percussion; Ann Mozina, flutes; Pedro Ramiro, violin; Libby Roberts, piano; Brianna Trainor, percussion; Cameron Tubbs, cello; and Austin Wright, clarinets. They will be augmented for this performance by Mizzou graduate student Tyler Hannsz on viola. MNMI’s post-doctoral fellow Yoshiaki Onishi serves as the Ensemble’s assistant conductor.

You can hear some past performances by the Mizzou New Music Ensemble using the embedded player below.

Cellist T.J. Borden coming to Mizzou for residency, concert

Cellist and composer T. J. Borden will visit Mizzou next month for a residency and concert.

Borden (pictured) will be in Columbia on Tuesday, April 9 and Wednesday, April 10. While on campus, he’ll make a presentation to Mizzou composition students and give private lessons to selected cello students.

He’ll wrap up his visit with a concert at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday night at Whitmore Recital Hall, performing a work by Mizzou New Music Initative post-doctoral fellow Yoshi Onishi, plus music by composers Zeynap Toraman and Carolyn Chen and the world premiere of “Soften the World,” a new piece for cello, percussion, and electronics by Daniel Meyer-O’Keeffe.

A critically acclaimed performer of contemporary music, Borden currently is working towards his DMA at UC San Diego. He is a member of Mivos Quartet, a string quartet specializing in new music, and of the [Switch~ Ensemble], a group dedicated to the performance of works that incorporate multimedia into live performance (and that also includes Mizzou percussion professor Megan Arns among its members.)  He previously earned his BM degree at Ithaca College and his MM at the University at Buffalo,

As a cellist, Borden has worked with established composers including Brian Ferneyhough, La Monte Young, Alvin Lucier, Phillippe Leroux, and Steven Mackey, as well as with younger composers such as Wojtek Blecharz, Zane Merritt, Ben Isaacs, Lena Nietfeld, and Matt Sargent.

He has performed with ensembles and musicians including the JACK Quartet, the Theater of Eternal Music Brass and String Band, the Slee Sinfonietta, Ensemble Offspring, Tony Conrad, Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky, and Steve McCaffery.  Borden’s festival appearances include performances at the Soundways New Music Festival in St. Petersburg, June in Buffalo, the New Media Art and Sound Summit, the New York City Electroacoustic Music Festival,  and more.

As a composer, Borden has been commissioned by organizations and performers such as Cleveland Institute of Art, Hochstein Alumni Orchestra, and hammered dulcimer virtuoso Mitzie Collins. You can hear T.J. Borden’s music on his website and on his Bandcamp page.

Mizzou New Music Ensemble to perform works
from MADSM competition, Mizzou and more
on Sunday, December 2 at Whitmore Recital Hall

The Mizzou New Music Ensemble will perform four new student works plus two pieces from acclaimed contemporary composers in a concert at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, December 2 at Whitmore Recital Hall, 135 Fine Arts Building on the Mizzou campus. Admission is free and open to the public.

Two of the student works were selected for the performance through the first-ever Collegiate Composition Competition co-sponsored this year by the Mizzou New Music Initiative and the Missouri Association of Departments and Schools of Music (MADSM).

Ryan Jeschke, a senior composition major at Truman State University, won the MADSM competition’s undergraduate division with “Gunkanjima.” named for an island off the coast of Nagasaki, Japan that for nearly a century was a densely populated center for coal mining, then completely abandoned in the 1970s. The Ensemble will perform the work’s first movement, “The Shamisen.”

Daniel Vega, a first-year master’s student in composition at Mizzou, was the MADSM competition winner in the graduate division for “Natales,” which draws inspiration from the music of Estonian composer Arvo Pärt.

The other two student works were written by University of Missouri undergraduates. “Starry Night” by Ben Dawson, a junior working toward a composition degree at Mizzou, depicts “a cloudy, lonely night” with teasing fragments of a melody that is fully revealed at the end, while “A Dance Through Desire” by Holden Franklin, a freshman composition major, evokes feelings of a missed connection following a brief encounter.

Completing the program will be “à propos,” a work in four parts by French composer Fabien Lévy that was inspired by Arte Povera, an Italian artistic movement of the 1960s; and “Rising Tide,” written in 2015 by Nina C. Young, who will visit the Mizzou campus on November 30 and coach the Ensemble in preparation for the performance.

The seven-member Mizzou New Music Ensemble (pictured) is made up of University of Missouri graduate students under the direction of Stefan Freund, a cellist, composer, conductor, professor of composition, and artistic director of the Mizzou New Music Initiative.

The Ensemble’s members for the 2018-19 season are Hannah Hutchins, percussion; Ann Mozina, flutes; Pedro Ramiro, violin; Elisabeth Roberts, piano; Brianna Trainor, percussion; Cameron Tubbs, cello; and Austin Wright, clarinets, augmented for this performance by guest musicians Kassandra Ormsby, bassoon; and Morgan Owen, viola. Post-doctoral fellow Yoshiaki Onishi is the Ensemble’s assistant conductor, and will conduct the performance of “à propos” at this concert.