Posts Tagged ‘ Sinquefield Composition Prize

Santiago Beis wins 2021 Sinquefield Composition Prize

The University of Missouri School of Music and the Mizzou New Music Initiative have awarded the 2021 Sinquefield Composition Prize to Santiago Beis.

Beis is a first-year graduate student working toward a master’s degree in composition at Mizzou. He submitted “La sed y el Agua” (“Thirst and Water”), a work for piano and string orchestra, to the competition and was selected for the prize by a panel of independent judges.

The adjudicators for the 2021 competition were Yigit Kolat, composer and lecturer at the University of Washington; Wendy Richman, violist with the International Contemporary Ensemble and The Rhythm Method; and Evan Williams, assistant professor of music and director of instrumental studies at Rhodes College.

Now in its 16th year, the Sinquefield Composition Prize is the top award for a composition student at Mizzou.

As this year’s winner, Beis (pictured) will be commissioned to write a new work for the string section of the MU Philharmonic to be recorded in Spring 2021. With the commission, Beis also will receive a cash prize for the production of the score and parts.

Born in Rivera, Uruguay, Beis earned his bachelor’s degree in composition and conducting from EMBAP – UNESPAR (Escola de Música e Belas Artes do Paraná – Universidade Estadual do Paraná) in Curitiba, Brazil. As an undergraduate, he collaborated with a number of local and regional new music ensembles, and won first prizes in two Brazilian national composition festivals, the Funarte Prémio de Composição Clássica and the Bienal Música Hoje.

Also a performer who plays piano, flute, saxophone, trumpet, and synthesizers, Beis has recorded his jazz compositions with various groups including his own trio, which was recognized as one of the top five groups in the “Made in NY Jazz Gala” competition at the Tribeca Center of Performing Arts in New York City.

The other finalists for the 2021 Sinquefield Composition Prize were Daniel Fitzpatrick, Daniel Vega, Oswald Huynh, and Luis Hermano Bezerra.

Ben Rouder wins 2020 Sinquefield Composition Prize

The University of Missouri School of Music and the Mizzou New Music Initiative have awarded the 2020 Sinquefield Composition Prize to Ben Rouder.

Rouder (pictured) is a junior working toward a bachelor’s degree in composition at Mizzou. He submitted “M.I.S.”, a work for chamber ensemble originally composed as part of last year’s “Influences Symphony” project, to the competition and was selected for the prize by independent judges.

The adjudicators for the 2020 competition were Yotam Haber, associate professor of music composition at the University of Missouri-Kansas City and Nina C. Young, assistant professor at the University of Southern California.

Now in its 15th year, the Sinquefield Composition Prize is the top award for a composition student at Mizzou.

As this year’s winner, Rouder now will be commissioned to write an original work for the University Singers, conducted by Paul Crabb, who will premiere it as part of the Chancellor’s Arts Showcase on Friday, February 28, 2020 at the Missouri Theatre in Columbia. With the commission, Rouder also receives a cash prize for the production of the score and parts, and will have his work professionally recorded.

Rouder is a native of Columbia, MO who graduated from Rock Bridge High School. His music has been performed by groups including the Columbia Civic Orchestra, the University of Missouri Tuba/Euphonium Ensemble, the University of Missouri Brass Choir, and the Mizzou New Music Ensemble.

He was the winner in the Open Orchestral division of the 2019 Missouri Composers Project competition for his work “Social Justice Warrior.” Rouder also is the founder and current administrator of the Seventh Column Chamber Ensemble, a student-run chamber orchestra founded in 2019.

The other finalists for the 2020 Sinquefield Composition Prize were Daniel Fitzpatrick, Luis Hermano Bezerra, and Hans Bridger Heruth.

Niko Schroeder wins 2019 Sinquefield Composition Prize

Photo by SnoStudios PhotographyThe University of Missouri School of Music and the Mizzou New Music Initiative have awarded the 2019 Sinquefield Composition Prize to Niko Schroeder.

Schroeder (pictured) is in his first year of study for a master’s degree in composition at Mizzou. He submitted “genealogy I,” a work written for piano, violin, and cello, to the competition and was selected for the prize by a panel of independent judges.

The adjudicators for the 2019 competition were Emily Koh, assistant professor of composition at the University of Georgia; Sky Macklay, assistant professor of music at Valparaiso University; and David Werfelmann, assistant professor of music theory and composition at Webster University.

Now in its 14th year, the Sinquefield Composition Prize is the top award for a composition student at Mizzou.

As this year’s winner, Schroeder now will be commissioned to write an original work for the University Philharmonic Orchestra, directed by Barry Ford, which will premiere it as part of the Chancellor’s Arts Showcase on Monday, April 8, 2019 at the Missouri Theatre in Columbia. With the commission, Schroeder also receives a cash prize for the production of the score and parts, and will have his work professionally recorded.

Originally from Waverly, IA, Schroeder earned his bachelor of arts degree from Grand Valley State University in Allendale, MI.

While he was a student there, he served as sound engineer and student manager for the Grand Valley State University New Music Ensemble and won several awards, including “Composer of the Year” for the 2015-16 and 2016-17 school years; the 2017 Concerto Competition; and the Glenn A. Niemeyer Award, the highest distinction for student contributions to the university.

A performer as well as a composer and engineer, Schroeder has toured with rock and contemporary classical ensembles and regularly performs with his polka band, the Bierkeller Boys.

The other finalists for the 2019 Sinquefield Composition Prize were Dustin Dunn and Ben Rouder.

Aaron Mencher wins 2018 Sinquefield Composition Prize

The University of Missouri School of Music and the Mizzou New Music Initiative have awarded the 2018 Sinquefield Composition Prize to Aaron Mencher.

Mencher (pictured) is a junior and Sinquefield Scholar at Mizzou, studying composition with Carolina Heredia. He submitted “Bluish Orange,” a work written for flute, clarinet, and saxophone, to the competition and was selected for the prize by a panel of independent judges.

The adjudicators for the 2018 competition were Jennifer Jolley, assistant professor of composition at Ohio Wesleyan University; LJ White, lecturer in composition at Washington University; and Yoshiaki Onishi, a freelance composer in Columbia, MO.

Now in its 13th year, the Sinquefield Composition Prize is the top award for a composition student at Mizzou.

As this year’s winner, Mencher now will be commissioned to write an original work for Mizzou’s University Wind Ensemble, conducted by Brian Silvey, which will premiere it as part of the Chancellor’s Arts Showcase on Monday, April 9, 2018 at the Missouri Theatre in Columbia. With the commission, Mencher also receives a cash prize for the production of the score and parts, and will have his work professionally recorded.

Coming to the University of Missouri from John’s Creek, GA, a suburb of Atlanta, Aaron Mencher also is one of three Mizzou student composers selected this year to take part in reading sessions of new works with members of the St. Louis Symphony.

His piece “Fast-Forward” recently won the American Modern Ensemble’s composition competition in the Young Artist category for composers under the age of 22. In conjunction with this award, Mencher’s piece “Rise” will be performed by cellist Dave Eggar in a concert in November at National Sawdust in Brooklyn, NY.

In 2016, Mencher won the Boston New Music Initiative’s Young Composers Competition with his work “Uncertainly Yours,” which was performed by the Mizzou New Music Ensemble as part of their season-opening concert in October in Columbia, and then by BNMI’s ensemble in November in Boston.
Mencher’s piece “New” won awards in the 2015 NAfME Student Composers Competition and the 2016 American Prize in Composition – Band/Wind Ensemble, Student Division competition. It has been performed by the All-National Concert Band and Mizzou’s University Wind Ensemble, and has been published by Murphy Music Press.

The other finalists for the 2018 Sinquefield Composition Prize were Dustin Dunn, Jake Smucker, Ben Rouder, and Ben Colagiovanni.

Composers Festival spotlight: Henry Breneman Stewart

The University of Missouri’s representative among the eight resident composers for this year’s Mizzou International Composers Festival is Henry Breneman Stewart, who just completed a master’s degree in composition at Mizzou.

While at Mizzou, Stewart (pictured) has composed works for the Mizzou New Music Ensemble, Columbia Civic Orchestra, University Singers and more, and served as the “composer on call” for the Mizzou New Music Initiative’s Composer Connection distance-learning program.

Most notably, he was the winner of the 2016 Sinquefield Composition Prize – the university’s top honor for a student composer – which resulted in a commission to write a new original work that was premiered at the 2016 Chancellor’s Arts Showcase.

A native of Lancaster County, PA, Stewart came to Mizzou via Goshen College in Goshen, IN, where he earned a BA in music and biochemistry, studying composition with Dr. Jorge Muñiz of Indiana University South Bend.

His interest in music began in childhood, as he grew up singing four-part harmony at East Chestnut Street Mennonite Church in Lancaster and began playing piano at age 5, later learning saxophone, flute and accordion as well.

During his sophomore year at Goshen, Stewart and two friends started the indie-folk band Moral Circus, which released a full-length album in early 2014. In addition to the Mennonite tradition, he cites as significant influences the music of Krzysztof Penderecki, James Blake, Shostakovich, Kanye West, Samuel Barber, Johnny Greenwood, and Run the Jewels.

When the 2017 MICF is over, Stewart will be staying in Columbia to earn a second master’s degree in music theory while also applying to doctoral programs in composition.

For more about Henry Breneman Stewart, you can listen to him talk about the process of creating a commission and his work that will be premiered at the MICF in an interview recorded in June for KMUC’s weekly “Mizzou Music” program.. You can hear his music in the embedded players below and on his SoundCloud page.

“Sun Will Rise In Black,” commissioned by the Columbia Civic Orchestra with funding from the Sinquefield Charitable Foundation and performed by Natalia Bolshakova, piano, and the Columbia Civic Orchestra, Stefan Freund, conductor.

“Love Your Enemy,” performed by the Mizzou New Music Ensemble

“Sonnet 73: De Profundis,” commissioned as a result of winning the 2016 Sinquefield Composition Prize, and performed by the University of Missouri University Singers, directed by R. Paul Crabb.

Mizzou composer Douglas Osmun featured in Columbia Missourian

Mizzou composer Douglas Osmun, a first-year graduate student in composition and the winner of the 2017 Sinquefield Composition Prize, was the subject of a feature story this week in the Columbia Missourian.

Osmun (pictured) talked with reporter Ann Marion about his composition process and about “First Fig,” the work he submitted in this year’s Sinquefield Prize competition. As the winner of the competition, Osman was commissioned to write a new work for the University Philharmonic, which will get a premiere performance in April at the annual Chancellor’s Arts Showcase at the Missouri Theatre.

You can read the whole story here.

Mizzou composer’s work to be performed at SCI conference

The Society of Composers, Inc (SCI) has selected a work by Mizzou’s Douglas Osmun for performance at their annual national conference next year.

Osmun’s “First Fig,” a work for voice, cello, and piano that incorporates text by Edna St. Vincent Millay, will be performed on Friday, March 31 at the SCI event, which will take place March 30 through April 1 at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, MI.

Osmun (pictured) is a first-year graduate student in composition and winner of the 2017 Sinquefield Composition Prize. He’s also an alumnus of Western Michigan, having earned his BM in music composition there before coming to Mizzou.

Founded in 1965, SCI is an independent professional society of nearly 1500 members dedicated to the promotion, performance, understanding and dissemination of new and contemporary music.

You can hear a recording of “First Fig” in the embedded audio player below.

Mizzou composer Douglas Osmun wins 2017 Sinquefield Composition Prize

The University of Missouri School of Music and the Mizzou New Music Initiative have awarded the 2017 Sinquefield Composition Prize to Douglas Osmun.

Osmun, who grew up in Zeeland, MI, is a first-year graduate student at Mizzou studying composition with Stefan Freund. He submitted “First Fig,” a work written for alto voice, cello and piano, to the competition and was selected for the prize by a panel of independent judges.

The adjudicators for the 2017 competition were:
* Lee Hartman, instructor in music and music theory, University of Central Missouri;
* Allison Ogden, lecturer in composition, University of Louisville; and
* Christopher Stark, assistant professor of composition, Washington University.

Now in its 12th year, the Sinquefield Composition Prize is the top award for a composition student at Mizzou.

As this year’s winner, Osmun (pictured) now will be commissioned to write an original work for Mizzou’s University Philharmonic orchestra, with the premiere performance to be presented as part of the Chancellor’s Arts Showcase on Monday, April 10, 2017 at the Missouri Theatre in Columbia. With the commission, he also will receive funding for the production of the score and parts, and a professional recording of his work.

Before coming to Mizzou, Osmun earned a BM in music composition at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, MI. While at WMU, he studied with Lisa Renée Coons and Christopher Biggs, and was named a Beulah and Harold McKee Scholar, one of the school’s three top awards for music students.

Osmun’s other awards and accomplishments include the Ron Nelson Award and Symphonic Band Commission; an international premiere of his work at the highSCORE Festival in Italy; a mini-grant from the Arts Council of Greater Kalamazoo; and serving as the Region V Student Representative for the Society of Composers, Inc.

The other finalists for the 2017 Sinquefield Composition Prize were Dustin Dunn, Hans B. Heruth, Aaron Mencher, and Jake Smucker.