Posts Tagged ‘ residency

Mizzou welcoming composer Andrew List for residency next week

The School of Music and the Mizzou New Music Initiative will welcome composer Andrew List to Columbia for a residency next Thursday, October 25 and Friday, October 26.

While he’s on campus, List, who’s a professor of composition at Berklee College of Music in Boston, will make a presentation on his music; give private composition lessons; and work with the University’s Percussion Ensemble, which will perform his work “Night Wanderings” as part of the “Percussion Extravaganza” concert on Thursday night at the Missouri Theatre.

A longtime Bostonian, List (pictured) earned his undergraduate and master’s degrees at the New England Conservatory and his doctorate in composition at Boston University. He writes music for a variety of instrumentations and genres, including works for orchestra, string quartet, soloists, and various chamber ensembles, as well as vocal and choral music, opera, and music for children.

He has received commissions and performances from many ensembles and soloists in North and South America and in Europe, including the Boston Classical Orchestra, Zodiac Trio, Alea III, Esterhazy Quartet, Interensemble, Kalistos Chamber Orchestra, North-South Consonance, Metamorphosen Chamber Orchestra, Concordia String Trio, Turtle Island String Quartet, pianists George Lopez and Winston Choi, cellist Emmanuel Feldman, and soprano Lisa Saffer.

Recordings of his music include releases by the Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra, with Eva Szekely as violin soloist, on the Albany label; by MONTAGE Music Society on MSR Classics; and Zodiac Trio on Blue Griffin.

List has won numerous awards and honors, and is the composer-in-residence at the Zodiac Music Academy and Festival in Valdeblor, Côte d’Azur, France, where he presents a composition class each summer. He also was the first American ever to serve as a composer-in-residence for the city of Amsterdam. Sponsored by the city, the Amsterdams Fonds voor de Kunst foundation, and the American Embassy in The Hague, he spent eight months there presenting concerts of his music and that of other American composers, as well as lectures and workshops at major conservatories throughout the Netherlands.

Composer Michael Daugherty’s upcoming residency
at Mizzou inspires three concerts featuring his music

Grammy Award-winning composer Michael Daugherty is coming to Columbia for a residency, and the University of Missouri School of Music and the Mizzou New Music Initiative are welcoming him with three concerts featuring his music in October.

Daugherty, who is a professor of composition at the University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre & Dance, will be in Columbia for two days. On the first evening of his residency, the MU Wind Ensemble will perform his works “On the Air” and “Niagara Falls” as part of a concert at 7:00 p.m. Monday, October 8 at the Missouri Theatre. Admission to the performance is $5 for the general public, free for MU students, faculty and staff with IDs.

The next evening, seven more of Daugherty’s compositions will be featured a concert devoted entirely to his music, with performances by Mizzou faculty ensembles ZouM and DRAX; the Missouri Saxophone Quartet; the Mizzou New Music Ensemble; and faculty soloists Eli Lara, Leigh Muñoz and Julie Rosenfeld. That concert will take place at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, October 9 at Whitmore Recital Hall, and is free and open to the public.

While he’s on campus, Daugherty (pictured) also will make a presentation on his music, give private lessons to composition students, and work with the Mizzou New Music Ensemble, who will complete the concert trilogy when they play two of his works in their first performance of the semester on Monday, October 15, also at Whitmore Recital Hall.

Daugherty is a composer, pianist, and teacher who’s originally from Cedar Rapids, IA. He is one of the most widely performed American concert music composers of his generation, influenced by Romanticism, Postmodernism, and popular culture, and known for referencing in his music iconic figures ranging from Elvis Presley and Superman to Frida Kahlo and Jackie Onassis.

His teachers included notable 20th century composers such as Jacob Druckman, Earle Brown, Bernard Rands and Roger Reynolds from 1980-82 at Yale; Pierre Boulez in 1979 and 1980 at IRCAM in Paris; and György Ligeti from 1982 to 1984 in Hamburg. Daugherty was also an assistant to famed jazz arranger Gil Evans from 1980 to 1982 in New York.

Daugherty’s orchestral music has received six Grammy awards, including “Best Contemporary Classical Composition” in 2011 and 2017, and has been commissioned and premiered by major orchestras such as the Albany Symphony, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Bournemouth Symphony (U.K), Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Nashville Symphony, National Symphony Orchestra, Pacific Symphony, Philharmonia Orchestra (London), Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra, RAI Symphony Orchestra (Milan), and San Francisco Symphony.

Composer Yevgeniy Sharlat coming to Mizzou for residency, concert

Composer Yevgeniy Sharlat is coming to Mizzou next month for a residency and concert.

Sharlat, who’s an associate professor at the University of Texas at Austin, will be in Columbia on Monday, October 1 and Tuesday, October 2.

While he’s on campus, he’ll give a presentation and private lessons to composition students and coach the Mizzou New Music Ensemble, who will perform his piece “Divertissement” in their first concert of the semester on Monday, October 15.

Sharlat’s visit will conclude with the premiere of his new work “Trio Contemplating the Moon,” which was commissioned by Trio Séléné with funding from the Mizzou New Music Initiative and will be performed as part of their concert at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, October 2 at Whitmore Recital Hall.

Born in 1977 in Moscow, Russia, Sharlat majored in violin, piano, and music theory at the Academy of Moscow Conservatory. Immigrating to the United States in 1994, he studied composition at the Juilliard Pre-College, Curtis Institute of Music, and Yale University, where he earned his masters and doctoral degrees.

He has written music for orchestra, chamber ensembles, solo, theater, ballet, and film, and was the recipient of the 2006 Charles Ives Fellowship from American Academy of Arts and Letters. His other honors include a Fromm Music Foundation Commission; ASCAP’s Morton Gould, Boosey & Hawkes, and Leiber & Stoller awards; Yale University’s Rena Greenwald Award; and fellowships from the MacDowell and Yaddo artists’ communities.

Sharlat has received recent commissions from organizations including the Gilmore Keyboard Festival, Seattle Chamber Players, Astral Artistic Services, and LA Piano Duo. His music also has been performed by ensembles such as Kremerata Baltica, the Seattle Symphony, the Hartford Symphony, Seattle Chamber Players, Chamber Orchestra Kremlin, and others.

Composer Jonathan Newman to visit Mizzou for residency

Photo by Peace Gardiner SavetzComposer Jonathan Newman is coming to Columbia this month for a residency at the School of Music.

Newman (pictured), who is director of composition and coordinator of new music at Shenandoah Conservatory in Winchester, VA,  will visit Mizzou from Wednesday, April 25 through Friday, April 27.

While he’s on campus, his activities will include coaching the Mizzou New Music Ensemble in rehearsal; giving composition lessons and a presentation on his works; and attending the concert by the Mizzou Wind Ensemble on Friday at the Missouri Theatre.

Wind and educational ensembles around the world frequently perform Newman’s music, and the Mizzou Wind Ensemble’s concert will include one of his best-known compositions, “Blow It Up, Start Again,” as well as “Avenue X” and “As the scent of spring rain…” In addition, Newman’s works “Moon by Night” and “1861” will be performed by Mizzou’s Symphonic Band at their concert on Sunday, April 29, also at the Missouri Theatre.

Trained as a pianist, trombonist, and singer, Newman creates music informed by an upbringing performing in orchestras, singing in jazz choirs, playing in marching bands, and accompanying himself in talent shows, incorporating pop, blues, jazz, folk, and funk into otherwise classical models.

Born in 1972, he received the Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and holds degrees from Boston University’s School for the Arts and from The Juilliard School, where his collaborative works for dance enjoyed multiple performances at The Juilliard Theater, Alice Tully Hall, P.S. 122, and Dance Theater Workshop.

Newman’s music has been performed by orchestras worldwide, including the Minnesota Orchestra, the Toronto Symphony, the Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music Orchestra, the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra at the 2015 BBC Proms, and many others.

In 2016 he was appointed composer-in-residence for the Chicago Youth Symphony Orchestra, which originally commissioned “Blow It Up, Start Again” in 2011 and performed four of his works, including the newly commissioned “Meridian,” during their 2016-17 season. Other recent projects include a re-imagined Mass for The Choir of Trinity Wall Street; a large-scale work commissioned by the Florida State University Wind Orchestra; “Prayers of Steel” for Chicago’s Gaudete Brass, and, with playwright Gary Winter, an opera based on the 1962 cult horror film Carnival of Souls.

Newman also has a connection to the Mizzou International Composers Festival’s resident ensemble Alarm Will Sound, having transcribed and arranged “Logan Rock With” and “Fingerbib” for their 2005 album Acoustica: Alarm Will Sound Performs Aphex Twin on Cantaloupe Records.

His works have been recorded on labels such as Avian, BCM, Brain Music, Cantaloupe, Cedille, Klavier, Mark Custom, Naxos, Potenza, and Summit Records. Newman also is a founding member of the composer consortium BCM International, which has released two albums.

You can hear some of Jonathan Newman’s music in the embedded players below and on his SoundCloud page.

“Blow It Up, Start Again,” a transcription with performance by the Florida State University Wind Orchestra, conducted by Richard Clary, recorded April 15, 2013 at Ruby Diamond Concert Hall in Tallahassee FL

“Stereo Action,” recorded by the Texas A&M-Commerce Percussion Ensemble at the 2010 PASIC in Indianapolis, IN

“My Hands Are A City,” as performed by the University Of Georgia Wind Ensemble, conducted by John Lynch, on their album “Millennium Canons: Looking Forward, Looking Back”

Khemia Ensemble visiting Mizzou for residency, concert on Tuesday, March 6

The new music group Khemia Ensemble will visit Columbia next week for a residency that will include a concert at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 6 at Whitmore Recital Hall.

Admission to the performance is free and open to the public.

With eight instrumentalists, two resident composers, and a visual artist, Khemia Ensemble (pictured) will present a concert program including works by the group’s founders Carolina Heredia and Bret Bohman, plus a new piece by Mizzou’s Dustin Dunn and music by Andy Akiho, Marcos Balter, Luciano Berio, Pierre Jalbert, and Harold Meltzer.

While they’re on campus, the group also will coach the Mizzou New Music Ensemble in a rehearsal and work with student composers in a reading session of new pieces, while individual members will take part in a composition seminar and present master classes on their instruments.

Khemia Ensemble was founded in 2014 in Ann Arbor, MI by Heredia and Bohman, spouses who now are, respectively, a post-doctoral fellow and an adjunct faculty member both teaching composition here at Mizzou. Drawing on the faculty and students of the University of Michigan, they assembled musicians from five countries in the Americas – Venezuela, Argentina, Brazil, Canada, and the United States – to form an ensemble that seeks to diversify and spread the music of living composers while providing unique concert experiences.

Since then, the ensemble has been featured on festivals and concert series such as Strange, Beautiful Music in Detroit; the third annual New Music Gathering; Latin IS America at Michigan State University;and the Biennial New Music Festival at the National University of Cordoba in Argentina. Khemia has held residencies at University of Michigan, Tufts University, Michigan State University, the National University of Bogota in Colombia, and the National University of Cordoba, as well as two consecutive years at Avaloch Farm Music Institute in New Hampshire. They released their first album Voyages in the winter of 2016.

You can hear some sample tracks from Khemia Ensemble in the embedded players below.

James Mobberley coming to Mizzou for residency next week

The Mizzou New Music Initiative will welcome composer and educator James Mobberley to the Mizzou campus for a residency next week.

Mobberly (pictured) currently is a distinguished professor emeritus and adjunct professor at the Conservatory of Music and Dance at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, having retired as a full-time faculty member there in 2016.

He’ll be in Columbia next Monday, February 26 and Tuesday, February 27 for a residency that will include a presentation on his music to a seminar of composition students, giving private lessons, and coaching the Mizzou New Music Ensemble, who will play his work “Toccatas and Interludes” at their concert on Monday night at Whitmore Recital Hall.

A Rome Prize winner and Guggenheim Fellow, Mobberley has written works for a variety of media, from orchestral, chamber and electro-acoustic music for the concert stage to music for dance, film, and video.

Born in Des Moines, Iowa and raised in Pennsylvania, Mobberley earned his master’s degree at the University of North Carolina and his doctorate at the Cleveland Institute of Music. He began teaching at UMKC in 1983.

He has been a resident composer with the Kansas City Symphony (1992-1999), and a visiting composer with both the Taiwan National Symphony (1999) and the Fort Smith Symphony (2000). Past guest residencies and workshops include the Taiwan National Symphony, the Ft. Smith Symphony, the Composers Forum of the East at Bennington College, the University of Texas at Austin, the University of Southern California, Oberlin College, Washington State University, the University of Arkansas, Heidelberg College, and more.

Mobberly has received commissions from the Fromm Foundation at Harvard University, Koussevitzky Foundation/Library of Congress, Barlow Endowment, Meet the Composer, Chamber Music America, National Endowment for the Arts, and numerous ensembles and individual performers. He also has received awards from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, League-ISCM, Meet the Composer, the Van Cliburn Foundation, the Shanghai Spring Festival, and many other organizations.

His music has been featured on two dozen recordings, notably an all-Mobberley album by the Czech National Symphony on the Albany label, as well as on labels such as Black Canyon, Bridge, Capstone, Centaur, Everglade, and Troppa Note.

You can see performances of two of James Mobberley’s works in the embedded players below, and hear many of his other compositions on his SoundCloud page.

“In B” and “Peace Study,” performed by pianist Anthony DeMare at the 2013 Tribeca New Music Festival

“Caution to the Winds” for piano and electronic tape, performed by Kristina Sandulova on February 15, 2008 in Utrecht, The Netherlands.

JACK Quartet coming to Mizzou for residency, concert on Friday, October 27

The acclaimed new music group JACK Quartet is coming to the University of Missouri for a two-day residency, culminating in a concert at 7:30 p.m. Friday, October 27 at Whitmore Recital Hall.

Admission to the concert is $5 at the door for the general public, free to Mizzou students, faculty and staff with ID.

In addition to the concert, while they’re on campus the quartet (pictured) will have coaching sessions with the university’s graduate string quartet and Mizzou New Music Ensemble, and take part in a convocation with the entire School of Music.

They also will present a free, public workshop with Mizzou New Music Initiative post-doctoral fellow Carolina Heredia on Thursday, October 26 at Whitmore Hall, performing the Missouri premiere of a new section of her composition “Ausências/Ausencias/Absences.” (JACK Quartet premiered the original, shorter version of Heredia’s work in 2016, and you can see them playing it, plus a couple of other sample performances, via the embedded video players at the bottom of this post.)

Called “superheroes of the new music world” by the Boston Globe, and praised as “the go-to quartet for contemporary music, tying impeccable musicianship to intellectual ferocity and a take-no-prisoners sense of commitment” by the Washington Post, JACK Quartet was formed in 2005 by violinists Christopher Otto and Ari Streisfeld, violist John Pickford Richards, and cellist Kevin McFarland, all alumni of the Eastman School of Music. In 2016, violinist Austin Wulliman and cellist Jay Campbell joined the group, replacing Streisfeld and McFarland.

JACK operates as a nonprofit organization dedicated to the performance, commissioning, and spread of new string quartet music. They have collaborated with a stellar roster of contemporary composers, including Derek Bermel, Cenk Ergün, Roger Reynolds, Toby Twining, and Georg Friedrich Haas. John Luther Adams, Chaya Czernowin, Simon Steen-Andersen, Caroline Shaw, Helmut Lachenmann, Steve Reich, Matthias Pintscher, and John Zorn.

The quartet has performed at major venues around the world, including Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center in the USA, as well as Muziekgebouw aan ‘t IJ (The Netherlands), IRCAM (France), Kölner Philharmonie (Germany), the Lucerne Festival (Switzerland), La Biennale di Venezia (Italy), Suntory Hall (Japan), and many others.

As part of an ongoing commitment to music education, the JACK Quartet spends two weeks each summer teaching at New Music on the Point, a contemporary chamber music festival in Vermont, and has long-standing relationships with the University of Iowa String Quartet Residency Program and the Boston University Center for New Music.  They also have taught and performed at schools including Columbia University, Harvard University, New York University, Princeton University, Stanford University, and the University of Washington.

“Ausências/Ausencias/Absences” by Carolina Heredia

“Intonations” by Derek Bermel

“Ritornello” by Caroline Shaw

Composer Steven Snowden visiting Mizzou for residency from October 1-3

Composer Steven Snowden will visit the Mizzou campus next week for a residency starting Sunday, October 1 and culminating in a “Composer Portrait” concert of his works at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, October 3 at Whitmore Recital Hall.

The concert will include Mizzou faculty ensemble DRAX performing the world premieres of “Where are Our Mothers” and “We Don’t Have Enough Time,” two new works commissioned from Snowden with support from the Mizzou New Music Initiative and the Sinquefield Charitable Foundation.

While on campus, Snowden (pictured) also will give a presentation to composition students about his music, and will coach the Mizzou New Music Ensemble on the performance of his work “Matilda,” which they’ll play at their concert on October 16 at Whitmore.

A native Missourian, Snowden grew up in the Ozarks and earned his undergraduate degree in music at Missouri State University.  After subsequently getting a master’s degree in music from the University of Colorado at Boulder and a doctorate from the University of Texas, he now is a freelance composer based in Boston.

This won’t be his first visit back to his home state in a professional capacity – he was one of the eight resident composers chosen for the 2011 Mizzou International Composers Festival – but he’ll be especially busy this trip, book-ending his residency in Columbia with stops on the campuses of his alma mater in Springfield and Central Missouri State University in Warrensburg.

Though he’s received extensive training as a composer, Snowden nevertheless cites vernacular music like bluegrass, folk, and rock as key influences. “It’s really important to me that someone who doesn’t come from a background of listening to classical music can still be intrigued and drawn into the music that I write,” Snowden told the Columbia Daily Tribune‘s Aarik Danielsen in 2011. “Because of that, I strive to incorporate many possible perspectives of listening that can appeal to the uninitiated as well as seasoned analytical listeners. Hopefully, that also makes for music that can endure multiple hearings in which new details and levels of understanding can continually be discovered.”

Snowden’s works have been performed at venues and festivals throughout North America, Europe and Asia, and he has earned honors and awards from the American Composers Forum’s national composition contest, ASCAP’s Morton Gould Awards, New Music USA, and many others.

Other notable accomplishments include helping to found and direct the Fast Forward Austin Music Festival in Texas (with another former MICF resident composer, Ian Dicke, from the 2014 fest), and serving in 2012 and 2013 as a Fulbright Scholar in Portugal, researching the implementation of motion tracking technology as a means to facilitate collaboration between music and dance. Snowden also was a visiting professor and composer in residence in 2013-14 at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.

You can hear samples of Steven Snowden’s music in the embedded player below and on his SoundCloud page.