Posts Tagged ‘ composer

Missouri Composers Orchestra Project seeks
recent works for performance in March

The Missouri Composers Orchestra Project (MOCOP) is looking for recent orchestral compositions written by Missouri residents to be performed at a concert in March, 2014.

Now in its third year, MOCOP is a collaborative effort to spotlight the work of Missouri composers that involves the Mizzou New Music Initiative, the Columbia Civic Orchestra (CCO), and the Sinquefield Charitable Foundation. By identifying composers of orchestral music and providing opportunities for the performance of their work, MOCOP strives to showcase the talent of Missouri and share it with the community.

Each year, works are selected through a competitive, blind judging process – one from the High School category and three from the Open category – to be performed by the CCO at a concert in Columbia. The compositions must be written for symphony orchestra and can be up to 10 minutes in duration. The works also must have been composed within the past 10 years, while the composer was living in Missouri.

Each selected composer will be awarded a $500 honorarium, and the four works chosen will be performed by the CCO in a concert at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, March 16, 2014 at Columbia College’s Launer Auditorium, 901 Rogers St. in Columbia.

The Columbia Civic Orchestra is a volunteer group located in Columbia, Missouri, dedicated to providing enjoyment for its members and audiences with the presentation and preservation of high-quality symphonic music.

The concert also will feature a performance of “American Sojourn,” by former Creating Original Music Project (C.O.M.P.) winner Kevin Hartnett, and the world premiere of the overture from Stefan Freund’s upcoming “Civil War Oratorio,” which was commissioned by the Columbia Civic Orchestra in honor of patron Dr. Jeanne Sinquefield.

Composers who wish to submit their work to MOCOP can find details on instrumentation and complete application materials online at http://mizzounewmusic.missouri.edu/project.html. Applications must be postmarked no later than December 13, 2013.

Mizzou New Music Ensemble to open 2013-14 season
on Friday, October 11 at Whitmore Recital Hall

The Mizzou New Music Ensemble will open their 2013-14 season with a concert at 7:30 p.m., Friday, October 11 in Whitmore Recital Hall, 135 Fine Arts Building on the University of Missouri campus. Admission is free for Mizzou students, $5 suggested donation for the general public.

The program will include works by the acclaimed contemporary composers Daniel Asia and Nico Muhly, as well as the world premieres of four pieces written by composers affiliated with Mizzou.

Daniel Asia’s ”Breath in a Ram’s Horn” (2003) is a song cycle based on five poems by writer Paul Pines, described as “imbued with images of family and Judaism, and their intertwining…filled with the difficulties and anguish of a life as it is really lived.”

”I Know Where Everything Is,” written by Muhly in 2007 on commission from the Seattle Chamber Players, “is a cycle of chords in a pile. Each chord has a series of possible voicings, and a series of possible quick ornamentations,” which begin with the most moderate and progress through a series of variations to a vigorous conclusion.

“Rhetoric and Drama in Ahuan Tones,” a brand new work by Mizzou alumnus Patrick David Clark, is a musical manifestation of twilight colors, using soft, delicate sounds and establishing “a feeling of free space and suspended time.”

Completing the program will be three works composed this year by current Mizzou students. Matthew Stiens’ “Rituals of Ancient Voices” is “a musical depiction of a druidic ceremony as I saw it,” utilizing extreme registers of each instrument in the ensemble and unusual techniques. “#YOLO” by Trey Makler is described as “energetic and exciting, heavily influenced by rock and popular music,” while Justin Pounds’ “Electric Brain,” is ”a fast-paced piece focused on a series of mixed-meter grooves inspired by the progressive rock genre.”

The seven-member Mizzou New Music Ensemble (pictured) is made up of University of Missouri graduate students under the direction of Stefan Freund, a cellist, composer and associate professor. However, while Freund is on research leave this semester, Patrick David Clark is directing the group. Clark earned his master’s degree in conducting at Mizzou in 2012; was the winner of the 2011 Sinquefield Composition Prize; and also holds a bachelor’s in composition from Mizzou and a DMA in composition from Rice University.

The Mizzou New Music Ensemble serves as the repertory group for the Mizzou New Music Initiative, an array of programs intended to position the University of Missouri School of Music as a leading center in the areas of composition and new music. As the repertory group for the Initiative, they work with faculty, students and visiting composers, and give public performances on campus and in the community.

The Ensemble’s members for the 2013-14 season are Rachel Czech, cello; Hsu Shun Jung, piano; Mary Jamerson, flute; Katherine Jones, violin; Ian McClaflin, percussion; Shawn Nemati-Baghestani, oboe; and Jeremiah Rittel, clarinets.

Composers Festival Spotlight: Jason Thorpe Buchanan

Jason Thorpe Buchanan

We end our series of profiles of the resident composers for the 2013 Mizzou International Composers Festival with Jason Thorpe Buchanan, who’s currently working on his Ph.D. at the Eastman School of Music, studying composition with Robert Morris and serving as a graduate TA at the Computer Music Center.

Buchanan began studying music at age fourteen at the College of San Mateo, CA, later attending San José State University and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. While working for his master’s degree at UNLV from 2008 to 2010, he taught courses in composition and music theory.

He has studied composition with Allan Schindler, Virko Baley, Peter Michael Hamel, Jorge Grossmann, Ricardo Zohn-Muldoon, Pablo Furman, Kevin Puts, Robert Aldridge, and Manfred Stahnke, as well as additional studies with Takayoshi Suzuki and Brad Lubman in conducting, and at Darmstadt with Georges Aperghis, Brian Ferneyhough, and Raphaël Cendo.

Buchanan spent 2010-2011 living in Hamburg, Germany, where he was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship at the Hochschule für Musik und Theater as a visiting scholar. He studied with Peter Michael Hamel, Manfred Stahnke, Georg Hajdu, and Sascha Lino Lemke while conducting research and interviews in regard to compositional process and aesthetics.

Buchanan has received awards from ASCAP, ACF, MPE, the NEON and Brevard Music Festivals, UNLV, SJSU, the Eastman School of Music, the American Prize, and the Miami Beach International Animated Film Festival. Recordings of his music are commercially available on the Melos Music label in the United States and the Windstream label in Japan.

He is the founder of Melos Music, a composer’s consortium for which he served as director from 2007-2012, as well as their annual New Music Concert series. During this past academic year, he served as assistant conductor for Eastman’s new music ensemble Musica Nova, as well as a board member of Ossia, coordinator for the Graduate Composers’ Sinfonietta, and co-founder/conductor of Eastman’s brand new Electroacoustic Initiative, the [Switch~ Ensemble].

You can see and hear Jason Thorpe Buchanan’s music being performed in various clips on his YouTube channel, and in the embedded video windows below.

Buchanan’s “Asymptotic Flux: First Study in Entropy,” performed in October 2012 at Eastman School of Music by the [Switch~ Ensemble], featuring Madison Greenstone, amplified bass clarinet; Lauren Cauley, amplified violin; Kelsey Farr, amplified viola; and Julia Nilsen, amplified cello.

“Amplified Box” Improvisation 1.0 (Study for Percussion Quartet) is an
improvisation with a homemade instrument built for Buchanan’s first percussion quartet.

Composers Festival Spotlight: Daniel Kellogg

The Mizzou New Music Initiative is pleased to welcome Daniel Kellogg as one of the two guest composers for the 2013 Mizzou International Composers Festival.

Kellogg originally is from Wilton, CT and has served since 2005 as assistant professor of composition at the University of Colorado, He has been lauded by the Washington Post as “one of the most exciting composers around – technically assured, fascinated by unusual sonic textures, unfailingly easy to listen to, yet far from simplistic.”

After graduating from the Curtis Institute of Music, Kellogg earned a masters of music and a D.M.A. from the Yale School of Music. He was chosen as Young Concert Artists composer-in-residence in 2002, and also has served as composer-in-residence for the South Dakota Symphony, the Green Bay Symphony, and the University of Connecticut.

Kellogg has had works premiered by the Philadelphia Orchestra, National Symphony Orchestra, San Diego Symphony, Colorado Symphony Orchestra, Ensemble Orchestral de Paris, Takács Quartet with the University of Colorado Wind Symphony, Aspen Chamber Orchestra; South Dakota Symphony, the United States Air Force Academy Band, and the choirs of Yale University.

His music has been performed at Carnegie’s Weill Recital Hall, the Kimmel Center, Lincoln Center, the Kennedy Center, China’s National Centre for the Performing Arts, and broadcast on NPR’s “Performance Today” and “St. Paul Sundays” among others.

Kellogg’s honors and awards include a Charles Ives Fellowship and a Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, six ASCAP Young Composer Awards, the BMI William Schuman Prize, and the ASCAP Rudolf Nissim Award.

His extended work Divinium Mysterium was a highlight of eighth blackbird’s 2004 album Beginnings, and will be performed by the Mizzou New Music Ensemble as part of the “Mizzou New Music” concert on Friday, July 26.

Here’s a time lapse video of Kellogg composing in his studio, with one hour compressed to 60 seconds.

Kellogg’s “Sim Shalom,” subtitled “A Hebrew Prayer for Peace,” sung by the combined choirs at the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Kellogg on his beginnings as a composer

Kellogg’s “Canticle of the Earth” for 14 Bassoons, in a world premiere performance recorded in February 2011 by the University of Colorado College of Music Bassoon Studio, directed by Yoshi Ishikawa. The ensemble, conducted by Allan McMurray, from left: Kent Hurd, Yahaira Nieves, Michael Christoph, Amanda Hoffer, Shih-han Chiu, Kaori Uno, Patty Fagan, Michelle Jones, Matt Cullen, Kristen Gogan, Brian Jack, Cody Dean, YoonJoo Hwang, and Ben Cefkin

Kellogg’s “Winter Lullaby: A Dirge” performed by Cornell University Glee Club and Choral Voices of Finland in April 2010 in Abbey Chapel, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA.

An excerpt from the world premiere of Kellogg’s “O Greening Branch,” performed by the Wheaton College Symphonic Band and choirs at the 150th anniversary concert for the college in November 2010.

Composers Festival Spotlight: Ryan Chase

Ryan Chase

Before being selected as one of the resident composers for the 2013 Mizzou International Composers Festival, Ryan Chase has had his music performed “in venues ranging from dive bars to Carnegie Hall.”

A native of Albany, NY, Chase earned a bachelor’s degree from the Mannes College of Music in 2008 and a masters degree from Indiana University in 2010. He currently is pursuing a doctorate at Indiana, where he also teaches undergraduate courses in post-tonal ear training and theory.

With conductor Ben Bolter and composer Jeremy Podgursky (who was a resident composer at the 2010 MICF), Chase also recently helped to founf Holographic, a new music collective in Bloomington.

His works have been performed by ensembles including Alaria, the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble, CIRCE, Contemporaneous, the IU New Music Ensemble, members of the San Francisco Opera Orchestra, the Chelsea Symphony, the Mexico City Woodwind Quintet, violinist Colin Sorgi, and new music soprano Ariadne Greif.

Chase was a Ford and Schumann Fellow at the 2012 Aspen Music Festival, and his music has been recognized with awards including a 2013 ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Award, two consecutive BMI Student Composer Awards (including the 2011 William Schuman Prize for Most Outstanding Entry), and the Audience Choice Award from the 2012 American Composers Orchestra Underwood Readings. His other awards include first prize in the 2011 National Association of Composers USA Young Composers’ Competition, the Jean Schneider Goberman Award, and the Bohuslav Martinú Award.

He currently studies at IU with Don Freund – father of Mizzou’s Stefan Freund – and also has studied with Claude Baker, David Dzubay, Keith Fitch, Gabriela Ortíz, David Tcimpidis, George Tsontakis, Chen Yi, Jeffrey Hass, John Gibson, and Alicyn Warren.

Earlier this year, Chase wrote the soundtrack to Euclid’s Watch, a short movie created by Red Tape Films at Indiana University as part of Campus MovieFest, the world’s largest student film festival.

You can hear an interview with Ryan Chase from 2012 on the podcast No Extra Notes here, and listen to some samples of his music online here.

Ryan Chase’s “Gold Rush” for five violins, performed by Kay Stern, Robin Mayforth, Jeremy Preston, Michael Nicholas, and Jennifer Cho for Composers, Inc.

Chase’s chamber symphony “II,” performed as part of his graduate recital at Indiana University Jacobs School of Music’s Auer Hall.

Composers Festival Spotlight: Wei-Chieh Lin

Wei-Chieh Lin

Today’s featured resident composer from the 2013 Mizzou International Composers Festival is Wei-Chieh Lin, who was born in Taichung, Taiwan, and now lives in New York City.

Lin earned his BM, MM, and DMA degrees in composition at The Juilliard School under the guidance of famed composer and teacher, the late Milton Babbitt. His works range from solo instrumental music to orchestral compositions to vocal and choral pieces, as well as jazz and folk arrangements.

Those works have been performed at venues in the U.S. and abroad, including the Gaudeamus Muziekweek, Centre Pompidou, Lincoln Center, Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall, Jordan Hall, and the National Concert Halls in Taiwan.

Ensembles that have played or commissioned Lin’s music include the Ensemble InterContemporain, Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, National Taiwan Symphony Orchestra, Taipei Philharmonic Orchestra, Le Nouvel Ensemble Moderne, Insomnio Ensemble, Xasax Ensemble, Makrokomos Ensemble, The New Juilliard Ensemble, Juilliard Orchestra, Hudson Symphony Orchestra, New York Classical Players Ensemble, Asko/Schoenberg Ensemble, Cadillac Moon Ensemble, and Formosa Quartet, as well as members of eighth blackbird and Klangforum Wien.

Lin’s compositions have received a number of awards, including selection for the 2012 International Composer Pyramid Competition; Honorable Mention of the Gaudeamus Muziek Prize of 2011; two ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Awards; first prizes in the 2009 and 2010 National Symphony Orchestra of Taiwan Composition Competitions: three National Taiwan Symphony Composition Awards, and the Palmer Dixon Award from Juilliard.

He also has participated in music festivals including the Aspen Music Festival, Wellesley Composers Conference and Chamber Music Center, MusicX Festival, Académie musicale de Villecroze, Domain Forget, Asian Composers League Music Festival, Foundation Royaumont Music Festival and Manifeste/Acanthes@Ircam Composition Workshop, and been a resident at Cité International des Arts in Paris.

You can hear samples of Wei-Chieh Lin’s music in the embedded video window and audio player below.

Insomnio performing Lin’s “Tracing the Shadows of Broken Time” in September 2011 at Vredenburg Leeuwenbergh in Utrecht, Germany as part of Gaudeamus Muziekweek 2011.

Composers Festival Spotlight: Andrew Davis

Andrew Davis

Continuing with our series on the resident composers for the 2013 Mizzou International Composers Festival, today let’s get acquainted with Andrew Davis.

Though he shares a name with a famous British conductor, this Andrew Davis is a composer and electric guitarist from Columbia, MD by way of Texas. He earned a B.A. in music from Yale University in 2009, and then in 2012 completed his M.M. in composition at the University of Texas at Austin.

Davis’ early experiences in music included playing trombone in concert bands and guitar in rock bands, which have led him to explore a variety of different genres and musical aesthetics.

He has written both acoustic and electroacoustic music for a variety of media, and his works have been performed by groups including the JACK Quartet, the Argento Ensemble, counter)induction, the Boston New Music Initiative, the University of Texas Wind Ensemble, the Yale Concert Band, the Florida State Wind Ensemble, and the University of Texas New Music Ensemble.

Davis’ music has been heard at a variety of festivals including the Festival of New Music at FSU, the Manchester New Music Mini-Festival, New Music on the Point, and SEAMUS, and he has received honors from ASCAP, Vox Novus, and ISCM-Texas,

You can hear samples of Andrew Davis’ music in the embedded video window and audio player below.

Davis’ “Open Airs” is a short work for string quartet commissioned in 2012 by the New Music on the Point Festival. It is performed here by the Skyros Quartet, the graduate string quartet-in-residence at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Composers Festival Spotlight: Eric Guinivan

Eric Guinivan

Today, we train our virtual spotlight on Eric Guinivan, a percussionist and composer who’s another of the eight resident composers at the 2013 Mizzou International Composers Festival.

A native of Wilmington, Delaware, Guinivan earned bachelor’s degrees in composition and percussion performance from the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music. He then relocated to Los Angeles, receiving a master’s degree and, in 2011, a D.M.A. in composition from the University Of Southern California Thornton School Of Music.

Most recently, he has relocated across the country once again, as in June of this year he took a job as assistant professor of composition at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, VA.

Guinivan’s music has been performed across the United States and in Spain, France, Greece, Estonia, and Japan, by ensembles including the Ovideo Youth Philharmonic Orchestra, the Young People’s Symphonic Orchestra of St. Louis, the Delaware Youth Symphony Orchestra, USC’s Thornton Symphony, Los Angeles Percussion Quartet, Quey Percussion Duo, and the New York Symphony Singers, among others.

He has received a number of awards and honors, including three BMI Student Composer Awards and two ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Awards, and has received commissions from the New York Youth Symphony, the Lotte Lehmann Foundation, the Michigan Music Teachers Association, the Delaware Youth Symphony Orchestra, and pianist Vicki Ray.

Guinivan began studying percussion at age 10 and has performed with numerous orchestras and chamber ensembles around the country. While living in Los Angeles, he was a co-founder of the Los Angeles Percussion Quartet, and served for three years as principal timpanist of the YMF Debut Orchestra. His debut performance as an orchestral soloist in 2008 was in a premiere of his own Concerto for Percussion and Orchestra with USC’s Thornton Symphony, and will made his Carnegie Hall debut in May 2011 premiering his work Meditation and Awakening with the New York Youth Symphony.

In 2012, the Los Angeles Percussion Quartet debut album Rūpa-khandha – which leads off with “Ritual Dances,” a 20-minute work that Guinivan wrote for the group – was nominated for Grammy Awards for Best Chamber Music Performance and Best Surround Sound Album.

Before taking the job at James Madison, Guinivan was an adjunct instructor at USC, where he taught composition, orchestration, music theory, and aural skills, and an instructor at Renaissance Arts Academy in Eagle Rock, CA. He also has presented guest masterclasses and percussion clinics at colleges and universities including Chapman University, San Francisco Conservatory, and Sakuyo Kurashiki University in Okayama, Japan.

You can hear examples of Eric Guinivan’s compositions on his website, his Soundcloud page, and in the embedded video windows below.

Concerto for Percussion and Orchestra, as performed in 2010 by Joven Orquesta Internacional, directed by Janko Kastelic with Fernando Arias as soloist.

“Sword Dance” (from Ritual Dances), performed by University of South Carolina Percussion Ensemble (Joe W. Moore III, Nick Guiliano, Tyler Loftin, and Anna Viviano).

Composers Festival Spotlight: Augusta Read Thomas

Augusta Read Thomas

It is a pleasure for everyone associated with the Mizzou New Music Intiative to welcome Augusta Read Thomas as one of the guest composers for the 2013 Mizzou International Composers Festival.

Thomas, 49, is University Professor of composition at the University of Chicago, and is only the 16th person ever to hold the title of University Professor. She was composer-in-residence for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra from May 1997 through June 2006, a residency that culminated in the premiere of Astral Canticle, one of two finalists for the 2007 Pulitzer Prize in Music. One of the most acclaimed composers of her generation, she has won praise for the dramatic, spontaneous quality of her work and her masterful use of instrumental color.

Born in Glen Cove, New York, Thomas studied composition with Jacob Druckman at Yale University, with Alan Stout and Bill Karlins at Northwestern University, and at the Royal Academy of Music in London.

From 1993 to 2001, she was an assistant professor, then associate professor of composition at the Eastman School of Music. In 2001, she became Wyatt Professor of Music at Northwestern University, serving there until 2006. In 2007-2008, Thomas was a Visiting Scholar in the Department of Music in the Division of the Humanities at the University of Chicago.

In addition to teaching in Chicago, she frequently undertakes short-term residencies in colleges, universities, and festivals across the United States and in Europe. For example, in March of this year Thomas served as guest composer for East Carolina University School of Music’s NewMusic@ECU Festival, and last month she was part of the composition faculty of June in Buffalo 2013. Both events featured masterclasses, workshops and performances of her works.

Also in March of this year, the Boston Symphony Orchestra premiered “Legend of the Phoenix,” a concerto written by Thomas on a commission from cellist Lynn Harrell and the BSO, and the third Thomas piece the BSO has premiered. For more about that work, check out the coverage from Boston’s NPR affiliate WBUR.

During her residency with the Chicago Symphony, Thomas premiered nine commissioned works, and also co-founded and curated the MusicNOW series. Her music has been championed by leading conductors including the CSO’s Daniel Barenboim, Pierre Boulez, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Oliver Knussen, Seiji Ozawa, Mstislav Rostropovich, Leonard Slatkin, David Robertson, Christoph Eschenbach, Ludovic Morlot, and Xian Zhang.

Thomas has had works commissioned by leading ensembles and organizations around the world, including Chanticleer, NDR [German Radio] Orchestra, Cleveland Orchestra, Pittsburgh Symphony, La Jolla Chamber Music Society, National Symphony, Radio France and the BBC Orchestra, Dallas Symphony, London and Boston Symphony Orchestras, Orchestre de Paris, BBC, Utah Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, and the ASCAP Foundation.

In addition to the numerous commercial recordings of her music available on major record labels, Thomas has released five of her own albums independently.

In May 2009, she was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters, considered the highest formal recognition of artistic merit in the United States. Thomas has also been on the Board of Directors of the American Music Center since 2000, as well as on the boards and advisory boards of several chamber music groups.

You can hear samples of August Read Thomas’s music on her website. In the embedded video windows below, you can see and hear Thomas talking about her music and the creative process, as well as performances of several of her works.

“Earth Echoes,” a Franke Institute for the Humanities talk by Thomas on February 13, 2013 at the University of Chicago’s Gleacher Center. Thomas discusses her creative process and topics including rhythm, counterpoint, harmony, text setting, motivic development, organic transformation, nuance, color, improvisation, spirit, and gestalt.

Thomas talks more about the creative process and the inspiration for her violin duet “Double Helix.”

Thomas’ composition “Of Paradise and Light for String Orchestra,” played by the University of Chicago Symphony Orchestra under the direction Barbara Schubert on May 26. 2012.

Thomas’ “Cathedral Waterfall,” performed in June 2011 by pianist Nicolas Horvath

The University of Illinois New Music Ensemble plays Thomas’ second violin concerto “Carillon Sky.”

Percussionist Ruud Roelofsen playing Thomas’ “Silhouettes” at the Royal Conservatory of Brussels

Rachel Barton Pine introduces and performs “Caprice” in 2006. The piece was written by Thomas in 2004 as a wedding present for Rachel Barton Pine and Gregory Pine.

Composers Festival Spotlight: Greg Simon

Greg Simon

We start the week with a look at another of the resident composers for the 2013 Mizzou International Composers Festival. Greg Simon holds a B.A. from the University of Puget Sound and an M.M. from the University of Colorado at Boulder, and currently is pursuing a doctorate at the University of Michigan. Before arriving in Michigan, he served on the faculty at the Metropolitan State University of Denver.

Simon has studied composition with Kristin Kuster, Carter Pann, Daniel Kellogg, and Robert Hutchinson; and with Kevin Puts and Robert Aldridge at the Brevard Music Institute, where he was awarded a fellowship. His works have been performed or commissioned by the Corvallis Youth Symphony; the Playground Ensemble of Denver; the Fifth House Ensemble of Chicago; and groups in California, Washington, Oregon, West Virginia, Georgia, Michigan, Wisconsin, and more.

He has presented work at conferences for the American Band College, the College Band Directors’ National Association, the World Saxophone Congress, and the North American Saxophone Alliance, and has been featured in radio and digital broadcasts from Pendulum New Music and WFMT.

Simon has won the Edward Levy and George Lynn Prizes for excellence in composition from the University of Colorado, and received recognition for his works from the Pacific Chorale, CBDNA, the Fifth House Ensemble, and ASCAP. His piece Foolish Fire for wind ensemble, written for Loveland High School, has received more than 20 performances in ten different states since its Colorado premiere. His work also is featured on recordings by the California State University, Fullerton Wind Ensemble and the Fifth House Ensemble of Chicago.

Earlier this month, Simon was named the winner of the POLYPHONOS 2014 Composer Competition sponsored by the Seattle new music vocal ensemble The Esoterics. Meanwhile, his piece “Dragonfly,” for mallet trio, has been named the Grand Prize Winner of the 2013 TorQ Percussion Seminar Composition Competition, and will be premiered this week by the TorQ Percussion Quartet in a performance at Acadia University in Wolfville, Nova Scotia.

A jazz trumpeter as well as composer, Simon has studied with Bill Lucas, Brad Goode, and Darmon Meader of the New York Voices. He has played with the Jodi-Renee Band, the Park Hill Brass, and others at jazz venues in Denver, Boulder and elsewhere. He is active as a proponent of new music for improvising musicians, and has performed as featured soloist in world premieres from composers Michael Theodore, Hunter Ewen, Liz Comninellis, and Kari Kraakevik.

You can hear samples of Greg Simon’s music on his website, and he also maintains an active presence on Twitter as @gregsimonmusic. .

In the embedded video window below, you can see and hear a performance of the first section of Three Portraits, a 2008 piece by Simon that he called “my attempt to combine my two sound-worlds, jazz and concert music.”

Each of the work’s three parts is inspired by and uses elements of a specific jazz standard. Part I, “Stella’s Dance,” is based on “Stella by Starlight” by Ned Washington and Victor Young. Part II, “In Memoriam,” is based on Joe Henderson’s “Recorda-me” and can be seen here; while part III, “Speaking of Love,” is inspired by “Secret Love” by Sammy Fain and Paul Francis Webster, and can be seen here.

The performances were recorded at the University of Colorado by a group including Julia Barnett, flute; Kristen Denny, clarinet; Filip Lazovski, violin; Psyche Dunkhase, cello; Christopher Hatton, piano; and Adams Collins, percussion, with Michael Boone as conductor.

In keeping with the idea of spontaneous music-making, this clip shows a performance of Simon’s “Le Bateau et Le Soleil,” created in 2008 for Iron Composer. Adapting a notion from the TV cooking competition show Iron Chef, Iron Composer is a music competition held at the Baldwin-Wallace Conservatory of Music in Berea, Ohio, in which five composers are given just five hours to write a piece of music. This performance by the Monument Piano Trio helped Simon’s piece win third prize, as judged by David Gompper, James Arey & Bob Fischbach.

Simon’s “27,” as performed by Andrew Allen, tenor sax & electronics

“Kites at Seal Rock,” written by Simon as part of his 2009 Piano Quintet and used as the soundtrack to the final chapter of “Black Violet Act I: The Leagues of Despair.” “Black Violet…” is an original illustrated story/live music event with narrative and art by Ezra Claytan Daniels, produced in collaboration with the Chicago-based chamber group Fifth House Ensemble.