Carolina Heredia wins Grand Prize in Chamber Music OC’s
inaugural International New Music Competition

Mizzou’s Carolina Heredia has won the John Corigliano Grand Prize in the first International New Music Competition sponsored by Chamber Music OC, a new music presenting and educational organization in Irvine, CA.

Heredia, who is an assistant professor of composition at Mizzou, won the prize for “Ausencias,” a thirty-minute intermedia work for string quartet, fixed media, dance, and interactive video that also can be performed in a music-only format.

The original music-only version was premiered by JACK Quartet in March 2016, and the full work was first performed in March 2017 at the Duderstadt Video Studio at the University of Michigan.

Heredia (pictured) also won the competition’s “Wonder Woman” prize for her composition, which was one of 369 works submitted from 32 different countries. “Ausencias” will be featured in an upcoming Chamber Music OC performace, with details to be announced.

In addition to Heredia, there’s another prize winner who also has a Mizzou connection. Selim Göncü, who was a resident composer at the 2017 Mizzou International Composers Festival, won the competition’s California Love Prize for his work “dimINNUENDO.”

Composer Michael Daugherty’s upcoming residency
at Mizzou inspires three concerts featuring his music

Grammy Award-winning composer Michael Daugherty is coming to Columbia for a residency, and the University of Missouri School of Music and the Mizzou New Music Initiative are welcoming him with three concerts featuring his music in October.

Daugherty, who is a professor of composition at the University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre & Dance, will be in Columbia for two days. On the first evening of his residency, the MU Wind Ensemble will perform his works “On the Air” and “Niagara Falls” as part of a concert at 7:00 p.m. Monday, October 8 at the Missouri Theatre. Admission to the performance is $5 for the general public, free for MU students, faculty and staff with IDs.

The next evening, seven more of Daugherty’s compositions will be featured a concert devoted entirely to his music, with performances by Mizzou faculty ensembles ZouM and DRAX; the Missouri Saxophone Quartet; the Mizzou New Music Ensemble; and faculty soloists Eli Lara, Leigh Muñoz and Julie Rosenfeld. That concert will take place at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, October 9 at Whitmore Recital Hall, and is free and open to the public.

While he’s on campus, Daugherty (pictured) also will make a presentation on his music, give private lessons to composition students, and work with the Mizzou New Music Ensemble, who will complete the concert trilogy when they play two of his works in their first performance of the semester on Monday, October 15, also at Whitmore Recital Hall.

Daugherty is a composer, pianist, and teacher who’s originally from Cedar Rapids, IA. He is one of the most widely performed American concert music composers of his generation, influenced by Romanticism, Postmodernism, and popular culture, and known for referencing in his music iconic figures ranging from Elvis Presley and Superman to Frida Kahlo and Jackie Onassis.

His teachers included notable 20th century composers such as Jacob Druckman, Earle Brown, Bernard Rands and Roger Reynolds from 1980-82 at Yale; Pierre Boulez in 1979 and 1980 at IRCAM in Paris; and György Ligeti from 1982 to 1984 in Hamburg. Daugherty was also an assistant to famed jazz arranger Gil Evans from 1980 to 1982 in New York.

Daugherty’s orchestral music has received six Grammy awards, including “Best Contemporary Classical Composition” in 2011 and 2017, and has been commissioned and premiered by major orchestras such as the Albany Symphony, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Bournemouth Symphony (U.K), Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Nashville Symphony, National Symphony Orchestra, Pacific Symphony, Philharmonia Orchestra (London), Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra, RAI Symphony Orchestra (Milan), and San Francisco Symphony.

Dustin Dunn wins UMSL Young Composers Competition

Dustin Dunn’s composition “In the Shadow of Shepherd Mountain” has been selected as the winner of the 2018 UMSL Young Composers Competition (Wind Ensemble, division 2).

The work will be premiered by the UMSL Wind Ensemble as part of a concert at 7:30 p.m.  Wednesday, October 17 at the Touhill Performing Arts Center on the campus of the University of Missouri – St. Louis.

Dunn (pictured), a senior from Annapolis, Missouri, is attending Mizzou on a full Sinquefield Scholarship from the Mizzou New Music Initiative.

He previously has received awards for his music from the Music Teachers National Association and the Missouri Composers Project, and was one of three Mizzou composers chosen last year to have his work read by musicians from the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra.

You can read more about Dustin Dunn in the feature about him published in 2015 in Mizzou magazine.

Missouri Composers Project (MOCOP) seeks
new orchestral, choral music for concert in March 2019

Writing a new work for orchestra or chorus is a major accomplishment, yet for many composers, it’s just the first step in bringing their music to life. A commissioned work customarily will get a premiere performance, but there’s no guarantee it will be heard again – unless the composer can find more opportunities to get it played.

Recognizing this ongoing issue, the Missouri Composers Project (MOCOP) once again in 2019 will offer performance opportunities for new, large-ensemble music written by Missouri residents.

Now in its ninth year, MOCOP is a collaborative effort involving the Mizzou New Music Initiative, the Columbia Civic Orchestra (CCO), the Columbia Chamber Choir, and the Sinquefield Charitable Foundation.

Each year, recently composed works are selected through a competitive, blind judging process and are performed by the CCO and Chamber Choir at a concert in Columbia. Each of the composers of the selected works also is awarded a $500 honorarium.

MOCOP’s 2019 competition has four categories: High School Choral and High School Orchestral, for Missouri composers currently in high school, and Open Choral and Open Orchestral, for Missouri composers of any age.

The CCO and the Columbia Chamber Choir will perform the selected works in a concert at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, March 10, 2019 at First Baptist Church, 1112 E Broadway, in Columbia.

Composers who wish to submit their work to MOCOP can find details on eligibility and instrumentation plus complete application materials online at http://mizzounewmusic.missouri.edu/mocop.

Applications must be submitted no later than Monday, December 3, 2018.

The Columbia Civic Orchestra is a volunteer group located in Columbia, Missouri, dedicated to providing enjoyment for its members and audiences with the presentation and preservation of high-quality symphonic music.

The Columbia Chamber Choir in a subset of the Columbia Chorale, which works to promote choral music of the highest artistic quality and to stimulate a greater community understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment of choral music by presenting programs appealing to a wide cross-section of Missouri residents and visitors.

Composer Yevgeniy Sharlat coming to Mizzou for residency, concert

Composer Yevgeniy Sharlat is coming to Mizzou next month for a residency and concert.

Sharlat, who’s an associate professor at the University of Texas at Austin, will be in Columbia on Monday, October 1 and Tuesday, October 2.

While he’s on campus, he’ll give a presentation and private lessons to composition students and coach the Mizzou New Music Ensemble, who will perform his piece “Divertissement” in their first concert of the semester on Monday, October 15.

Sharlat’s visit will conclude with the premiere of his new work “Trio Contemplating the Moon,” which was commissioned by Trio Séléné with funding from the Mizzou New Music Initiative and will be performed as part of their concert at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, October 2 at Whitmore Recital Hall.

Born in 1977 in Moscow, Russia, Sharlat majored in violin, piano, and music theory at the Academy of Moscow Conservatory. Immigrating to the United States in 1994, he studied composition at the Juilliard Pre-College, Curtis Institute of Music, and Yale University, where he earned his masters and doctoral degrees.

He has written music for orchestra, chamber ensembles, solo, theater, ballet, and film, and was the recipient of the 2006 Charles Ives Fellowship from American Academy of Arts and Letters. His other honors include a Fromm Music Foundation Commission; ASCAP’s Morton Gould, Boosey & Hawkes, and Leiber & Stoller awards; Yale University’s Rena Greenwald Award; and fellowships from the MacDowell and Yaddo artists’ communities.

Sharlat has received recent commissions from organizations including the Gilmore Keyboard Festival, Seattle Chamber Players, Astral Artistic Services, and LA Piano Duo. His music also has been performed by ensembles such as Kremerata Baltica, the Seattle Symphony, the Hartford Symphony, Seattle Chamber Players, Chamber Orchestra Kremlin, and others.

St. Louis Symphony Orchestra to read works by Mizzou composers
Mikkel Christensen, Ben Colagiovanni, and Libby Roberts

From left: Colagiovanni, Roberts, Christensen

Three University of Missouri student composers will have their works played this year by musicians with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra as part of a joint educational venture between the orchestra and the Mizzou New Music Initiative.

Student composers Mikkel Christensen, Ben Colagiovanni, and Libby Roberts were selected by SLSO Resident Conductor Gemma New to write new works for a 40-piece chamber orchestra drawn from the musicians of the St. Louis Symphony.

The three works will be read, played and critiqued in a private session on Wednesday, October 31 in St. Louis. The composers then will get a chance to revise their music for a second, public reading by the same musicians at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 3 at Powell Hall.

Colagiovanni is a senior from St. Louis working toward an undergraduate degree in composition at Mizzou, while Christensen, who’s from Lockhart, TX, and Roberts, a native of Philadelphia, PA, both are in their second year of study for a master’s degree. They are the second group of Mizzou composers to take part in the program, following Dustin Dunn, Aaron Mencher and Douglas Osmun in 2017-18.

“We’re very grateful to the St. Louis Symphony and Gemma New for the opportunity to give our students some practical experience working with an ensemble of world-class musicians,” said Stefan Freund, professor of composition at the University of Missouri School of Music and artistic director of the Mizzou New Music Initiative.

“Because there are two sessions, this program is particularly valuable as a learning experience,” Freund said. “There are other programs that give young composers the chance to have their works read by a professional orchestra, but they provide just one chance to work with the musicians.”

“With the two-session format, our composers are able to hear their music played and get feedback directly from Gemma New and the musicians,” Freund said. “Then they can make revisions, and can hear the results of the changes they’ve made in the second session. It’s the sort of lesson that just can’t be delivered in a classroom.”

Christensen, Colagiovanni, and Roberts already are working on their compositions, Freund said, and are expected to deliver the first versions of their works to the Symphony in early October.

Celebrated as one of today’s most exciting and enduring orchestras, the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra is the second-oldest orchestra in the country, celebrating its 139th year in the 2018/2019 season. Widely considered one of the world’s finest, the SLSO maintains its commitment to artistic excellence, educational impact, and community connection – all in service to its mission of enriching lives through the power of music. Today, the SLSO builds on the institution’s current momentum on all fronts, including artistic, financial, audience growth, and community impact, and looks toward the future with Music Director Designate Stéphane Denève.

MADSM Collegiate Composer Competition
entry deadline extended to Friday, October 19

The entry deadline for the 2018 MADSM Collegiate Composer Competition has been extended to Friday, October 19.

“Since this a new competition this year, and the fall semester has just begun, we wanted MADSM member institutions to have more time to get the word out, and their students to have more time to respond,” said Jacob Gotlib, managing director of the Mizzou New Music Initiative (MNMI).

MNMI is co-sponsoring the competition with the Missouri Association of Departments and Schools of Music (MADSM) to encourage the creation of original chamber music that can be played by high-school level musicians.

The MADSM Collegiate Composer Competition is open to all students currently enrolled in any MADSM member institution, with separate categories for undergraduate and graduate students. Composers are asked to write a new work from five to seven minutes in length for a group of three to five musicians, consisting of some combination of flute, clarinet, piano, violin, cello, and percussion.

The new deadline for scores and recordings to be submitted online is Friday, October 19, and winners will be announced on Monday, November 12.

Winning composers will be invited to the University of Missouri, where their pieces will be workshopped and recorded by the Mizzou New Music Ensemble. The Ensemble will premiere this year’s winning works in January 2019 at the Missouri Music Educators Association conference in Osage Beach, with the goal of encouraging future performances on concert programs around the state.

For more information or to submit an entry, go to https://music.missouri.edu/mnmi/madsm-composition-contest.

The Missouri Association of Departments and Schools of Music (MADSM) includes all institutions in the state of Missouri that offer post-secondary music study. MADSM offers a regular forum for leaders from these institutions to discuss issues pertaining to music study; to provide mutual support for each other; and to advocate for music education at the collegiate level, presenting a strong and unified voice for music education in Missouri.

Arrangement by Mizzou’s Stefan Freund featured on
new album by Medeski Martin & Wood with Alarm Will Sound

An arrangement by Mizzou’s Stefan Freund is featured on Omnisphere, the new album by Medeski Martin & Wood with Alarm Will Sound.

Freund is a professor of composition and the artistic director of the Mizzou New Music Initiative, as well as the cellist and a co-founder of Alarm Will Sound.

Recorded live in February 2015 at The Newman Center in Denver, Colorado, Omnisphere represents the first collaboration between “one of the most adventurous groups to emerge in jazz and improvised music in the last three decades” and “an orchestra that counts among the boldest forces in contemporary classical.”

The album features original music by members of both groups, as well as new arrangements by AWS members of two compositions from MMW’s 2004 release End of the World Party (Just in Case).

Freund’s arrangement of that album’s title track “End of the World Party” re-imagines the original’s mostly electronic accompaniment and production by the Dust Brothers’ John King as an orchestral score realized by Alarm Will Sound. The track has been released as the first single from Omnisphere, and was premiered online last week by DownBeat magazine.

Omnisphere will be released on Friday, September 14 on MMW’s Indirecto Records label as a limited-edition set of two vinyl LPs and in digital formats.