Composer Nina C. Young coming to Mizzou for residency, concert

Composer Nina C. Young will visit Mizzou at the end of this month to coach the Mizzou New Music Ensemble and give a pre-concert talk before a performance of one of her works.

Young (pictured), who is an assistant professor of composition and director of the electronic music studios at the University of Texas at Austin and a visiting composer at the Peabody Institute, will be in Columbia starting Friday, November 30.

She’ll spend some time during the day on Friday working with the Ensemble, which will perform her composition “Rising Tide” as part of their concert on Sunday, December 2 at Whitmore Recital Hall.

Then on Friday evening, Young will present a pre-concert talk starting at 7:00 p.m. before the Mizzou Electronic Music Showcase at 7:30 p.m. at the A.P. Green Chapel. The showcase will include a performance of Young’s piece “Sun Propeller” by violinist and MU faculty member Julie Rosenfeld.

Born and raised in Rockland County, NY, just outside New York City, Young earned degrees from McGill University in Montreal and from Massachusetts Institute of Technology before getting her DMA at Columbia University. Her music draws on a variety of influences, from classical to minimalism to pop and more, frequently combining electronics and conventional acoustic instruments.

Young’s works have been performed by ensembles including the American Composers Orchestra, the Minnesota Orchestra, Phoenix Symphony Orchestra, Le Nouvel Ensemble Moderne, JACK Quartet, Aspen Philharmonic Orchestra, and many others. She also is co-artistic director of the New York-based new music group Ensemble Échappé. Her honors include the 2015-16 Rome Prize, a Koussevitzky Commission from the Library of Congress, a Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the Salvatore Martirano Memorial Award.

Her interests in recent years have expanded to include collaborative, multidisciplinary works such as “Temenos,” a site-specific piece involving music, ballet, and the architecture of the Tempietto Del Bramante in Rome; and “Out of whose womb came the ice,” a work “commenting on the ill-fated Ernest Shackleton Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-17,” written for baritone, orchestra, electronics, and generative video and premiered in 2017 by the American Composers Orchestra Underground.

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