Archive for the ‘ Mizzou New Music Initiative ’ Category

Patrick David Clark wins 2011 Sinquefield Composition Prize

The University of Missouri School of Music is pleased to announce that Patrick David Clark (pictured) is the winner of the 2011 Sinquefield Composition Prize. Clark, a graduate student studying orchestral conducting, submitted his orchestral composition “Glancing Blade” to the competition and was selected for the prize by a panel of independent judges.

The adjudicators for the 2011 competition were Mara Gibson, director of the Community Music and Dance Academy in Kansas City and a member of the composition faculty at the UMKC Conservatory of Music; Eric Honour, professor of music at the University of Central Missouri in Warrensburg; and Forrest Pierce, assistant professor of music composition at the University of Kansas.

As winner of the 2011 Sinquefield Composition Prize, Clark now will have the opportunity to write an original work for one of Mizzou’s premier large ensembles, which will receive its world premiere on Monday, March 14, 2011 at the Chancellor’s Concert in Columbia. With the commission, he also receives a cash prize for the production of the score and parts and will have his work recorded.

Born in 1967, Patrick David Clark currently is currently working on a Masters degree in orchestral conducting at Mizzou, where he is studying with Edward Dolbashian. He also holds a Bachelors degree in composition from MU, which he earned studying with Dr. Thomas McKenney. Clark earned a DMA in composition from the Shepherd School of Music at Rice University, studying with Arthur Gottschalk and Richard Lavenda. He became a Tanglewood Fellow in 1998, and from 1999 to 2001 studied with Louis Andriessen at the Royal Conservatory of the Hague on a Netherlands-America Foundation Grant. Clark also has worked as a composer; as a writer for Andante.com; and as a teacher in the Netherlands, Los Angeles and Albuquerque, NM.

The other finalists for the 2011 Sinquefield Composition Prize were Michael Anderson, Grant Fonda, and David Witter. Please join us in congratulating all four composers on this notable achievement!

2011 Mizzou New Music Summer Festival to be held July 9 – 17

The Mizzou New Music Initiative will present the second annual Mizzou New Music Summer Festival from Saturday, July 9, 2011 through Sunday, July 17 on the campus of the University of Missouri.

The 2011 Festival will include a series of public concerts featuring music from contemporary composers, as well as workshops, master classes and other events. The Festival’s guest composers for 2011 will be Roger Reynolds (pictured), winner of the 1989 Pulitzer Prize for composition and professor at the University of California at San Diego, and Anna Clyne, a native of London who currently serves as the Mead Composer in Residence with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. The acclaimed new music group Alarm Will Sound, conducted by artistic director Alan Pierson, once again will serve as resident ensemble, as they did for the inaugural Festival in 2010.

Eight resident composers will be selected for the Festival through a portfolio application process to create a new work for Alarm Will Sound. They will receive composition lessons from Reynolds and Clyne; take part in rehearsals with Alarm Will Sound; and receive a premiere performance and professional live recording of their work. Composers selected as resident participants also will have the opportunity to return to Missouri for a residency at the Sinquefield Reserve sometime during the following academic year.

Last year, more than 120 composers, representing countries including the People’s Republic of China, France, Spain, Turkey, Korea, Mexico and the United States, submitted composition portfolios to participate in the festival. This year’s application process for resident composers begins November 1, 2010, and the deadline for submitting an application is February 1, 2011. For more information on applying to become a resident composer for the Mizzou New Music Summer Festival, please visit http://newmusicsummerfestival.missouri.edu/application.html.

A complete listing of events, times, dates and venues for the 2011 Mizzou New Music Summer Festival will be made available at a later date. For more information, please visit http://newmusicsummerfestival.missouri.edu/.

The Mizzou New Music Summer Festival and other programs of the Mizzou New Music Initiative are made possible through the generous support of the Sinquefield Charitable Foundation. The City of Columbia Office of Cultural Affairs and the Missouri Arts Council also have provided financial assistance for the Mizzou New Music Summer Festival.

Creating Original Music Project (C.O.M.P.) offers
recognition, prizes for student composers in Missouri

Is the next George Gershwin, Duke Ellington or John Williams in a school in St. Joseph, a practice room in Poplar Bluff, a rehearsal hall in Rolla, or somewhere else in the Show-Me State? If so, the Mizzou New Music Initiative’s Creating Original Music Project (C.O.M.P) wants to find that young composer.

Sponsored by the University of Missouri School of Music; the Department of Learning, Teaching & Curriculum; and the Sinquefield Charitable Foundation, C.O.M.P. is an annual statewide competition that recognizes Missouri students in grades K-12 who compose original works in a variety of musical styles.

Now in its sixth year, C.O.M.P. mailed information last month to music teachers across the state inviting students to participate in the 2010 competition. The winning composers and their schools will be awarded cash prizes, and the winning compositions will be performed at the Creating Original Music Project’s New Music Festival on Saturday, April 23, 2011 at the University of Missouri in Columbia.

Students in grades K-5 may submit compositions in the categories of Vocal Music or Instrumental Music. For grades 6-8, the categories are Fine Art Music or Popular Music; and for grades 9-12, they are Fine Art Music, Popular Music, Jazz, Folk Music, Sacred Music, or other styles. All entries must be original music written by the student, and only one entry per student is allowed. Arrangements of previously composed pieces or improvisation based on composed pieces will not be accepted.

Mentors and teachers are encouraged to offer support and critiques, though the submissions must be the students’ own original compositions. Music teachers and/or mentors may assist students in notating or recording the pieces, and each student who applies must have the signature and sponsorship of their school’s music teacher. Only three submissions per category per school are allowed. It is the responsibility of the school music teacher(s) to decide which three pieces per category will be entered in the contest. The postmark deadline for submission of all compositions is January 3, 2011.

For more information about the Creating Original Music Program and an application for the 2010 competition, please visit the C.O.M.P website at http://music.missouri.edu/COMP.

For students looking for additional guidance or feedback on their work, the Mizzou New Music Initiative also offers Composer Connection, a distance-learning program that gives aspiring composers a chance to talk with and receive instruction from a graduate student in composition at MU. Students can e-mail works in progress and ask questions about composing, and receive suggestions and answers directly from the composer on call. The composer on call for the 2010-11 academic year is Michael Strausbaugh, who can be reached by email at composerconnection@missouri.edu.

Video: The trailer for Genius Among Us, a 2009 documentary film about C.O.M.P. by Randy Sinquefield.

Mizzou New Music Summer Festival featured on MizzouWire, KDHX

The University’s online news service MizzouWire has a feature up now about the Mizzou New Music Summer Festival. You can read the article “Sounds of Summer: Mizzou New Music Summer Festival resonates with aficionados” by Nancy Moen here.

Also, Dr. Jeanne Sinquefield (pictured), founder and funder of the Mizzou New Music Initiative and head of the Sinquefield Charitable Foundation, recently was interviewed on the St. Louis community radio station KDHX (FM 88.1). You can listen to her talk about the Initiative and the Mizzou New Music Summer Festival with KDHX’s Nancy Kranzberg here. (Note: The embedded audio player is just below the photo on the linked page.)

Spotlight on Stefan Freund

Cellist and composer Stefan Freund is a big part of the Mizzou New Music Initiative. As associate professor of composition and music theory, Freund teaches young composers at Mizzou and directs the Creating Original Music Project (COMP). He’ll be busy during the inaugural Mizzou New Music Summer Festival, too, both as a teacher and as a performer with Alarm Will Sound, the Fest’s resident ensemble.

A native of Memphis, TN, Freund received a BM with High Distinction from the Indiana University School of Music and an MM and a DMA from the Eastman School of Music. His primary composition teachers included Pulitzer Prize winners Christopher Rouse and Joseph Schwantner as well as Augusta Read Thomas, Frederick Fox, Claude Baker, David Dzubay, and Don Freund, his father. He studied cello with Steven Doane, Tsuyoshi Tsutsumi, and Peter Spurbeck and others.

Freund is the recipient of numerous prizes, including multiple awards from BMI and  ASCAP, a Music Merit Award from the National Society of Arts and Letters, and the Howard Hanson Prize. He was selected as the 2004 Music Teachers National Association-Shepherd Distinguished Composer of the Year, and in 2006 was awarded the MU Provost’s Outstanding Junior Faculty Research and Creative Activity Award.

Freund also has received many commissions as a composer, and his music has been performed at venues such as Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, the Kennedy Center, Weill Recital Hall, NPR’s St. Paul Sunday Morning, the National Gallery of Art, the Aspen Music Festival, the Art Institute of Chicago, the International Performing Arts Center (Moscow), Glinka Hall (St. Petersburg), Queen’s Hall (DK), the Bank of Ireland Arts Centre, and other concert halls in Austria, Germany, and Greece. His works have been recorded on the Innova, Crystal, and Centaur labels.

As a cellist, Freund has performed at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, Merkin Hall, the Hermitage Theatre (RU), the Muzikgebouw (ND), the World Financial Center, and Miller Theatre.  He has recorded on the Nonesuch, Cantaloupe, and I Virtuosi labels as well as Sweetspot Music DVD.

Previously an assistant professor of composition at the Eastman School of Music, Freund also has served as a faculty member of the Sewanee Summer Music Festival, and presently is the Music Director and Principal Conductor of the Columbia Civic Orchestra.

For more about Freund, check out “The next sound: A new initiative supports aspiring composers, ” a feature story written by Dale Smith for the summer 2010 issue of Mizzou magazine.

In the first embedded video window below, you can see and hear Freund conducting the Columbia Civic Orchestra in a performance of his composition “Cyrillic Dream,” created in 2009 and inspired by a visit to Russia and the omnipresence there of the Cyrillic alphabet.  In the second window, you can check out Freund and Alarm Will Sound performing their rendition of “Revolution 9” by the Beatles in July 2009 at Le Poisson Rouge in NYC.

Spotlight on W. Thomas McKenney

As the Mizzou faculty member charged with overseeing the Festival, W. Thomas “Tom” McKenney has been involved in the event since its inception. During the next week, his task will be even more hands-on, as he works with the Festival’s eight resident composers, takes part in faculty presentations, and more.

McKenney, who is professor of composition and music theory and director of Mizzou’s electronic music studios, also will be represented during the Festival as a composer. His piece “Thirteen Ways of Looking at A Blackbird” will receive its world premiere performance by Alarm Will Sound at the Festival’s opening concert on Monday, July 12 at the Missouri Theatre Center for the Arts. You can read more about that composition, McKenney and the Festival in this article by Mallory Benedict published last week in the Columbia Missourian.

Dr. McKenney received his PhD in composition from the Eastman School of Music, and his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the College-Conservatory of Music of the University of Cincinnati. In 1970 he was named the Distinguished Composer of the Year by the Music Teachers National Association.

His compositions have been performed in Europe, South America, China, and throughout the United States, and he is the recipient of numerous grants and commissions. In 1987, McKenney was invited by the Ministry of Culture of the People’s Republic of China to present a series of lectures on the use of lasers and electronic music.

In addition to his work at the electronic music studio at the University of Missouri, he conducts the New Music Technology Institutes and has worked at Robert Moog’s studio, the Stiftelson Elektronikmusiktudion in Stockholm, Sweden, the Center for Experimental Music and Intermedia at North Texas State University, and the Center for Electroacoustic Music at the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

Dr. McKenney received the Purple Chalk Award for Excellence in Teaching, given by the Arts and Science Student Government, and the Orpheus Award, given by the Zeta Chapter of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia for significant contributions to the cause of music in America.

For more on McKenney, check out the profile written a couple of years ago by LuAnne Roth for SyndicateMizzou. In addition to the text, it includes a series of video clips in which he discusses a variety of topics, from his research and creative activity to the use of electronic instruments to the importance of emotion in music.

“The bottom line for McKenney is that “music has to speak to the human spirit. That’s what it’s really all about,” the interview concludes. “The violin might be just a wooden box with metal strings, “yet, put in the hands of an artist, the most beautiful things in the world can come out of it.” Ponder as well the human voice. “We could scream and say nasty, horrible things to other human beings,” he points out, “or we could sing and make beautiful sounds. That’s really what the human spirit is all about.” And that’s what motivates McKenney’s musical compositions.”

Mizzou New Music Initiative on Facebook, Twitter

In addition to this blog, the Festival website, and the main website for the Mizzou New Music Initiative, we’re also on Facebook and Twitter.

You’ll find our Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/moNEWmusic. If you’re a Facebook member, click on the “Like” button, and you’ll get updates from the page as part of your Facebook news feed.

You can follow the Mizzou New Music Summer Festival’s Twitter feed at: http://twitter.com/MizzouNewMusic.

About the Mizzou New Music Initiative

The Mizzou New Music Summer Festival is just one part of the Mizzou New Music Initiative, which brings together a diverse array of programs intended to position the University of Missouri School of Music as a leading center in the areas of composition and new music.

The Initiative is the direct result of the generous support of Dr. Jeanne and Mr. Rex Sinquefield, and the Sinquefield Charitable Foundation. The Sinquefields’ vision is to create an incubator for the composition and performance of new music, and to position Missouri as a major center for the music of tomorrow.

In addition to the Festival , the Initiative includes undergraduate composition scholarships, New Music Ensemble graduate assistantships, the Sinquefield Composition Prize, the Creating Original Music Project, and Composer Connection, a distance-learning program that lets composers connect with and receive instruction from a graduate student in composition at MU.

To learn more about the Mizzou New Music Initiative, please visit the MNMI home page on the School of Music’s site.  For more about the Sinquefields’ support for the MU School of Music, click here.