Archive for the ‘ Mizzou New Music Summer Festival ’ Category

Mizzou New Music in the News

If you’ve missed some of the recent coverage of the Mizzou New Music Summer Festival in the news media, here’s your chance to catch up.

* On Sunday, the Columbia Daily Tribune published a thoughtful and comprehensive preview story about the Festival by Aarik Danielsen.

* The St. Louis Beacon last week had a nice feature story about the Festival, written by Neel Thakkar.

* Stephanie Berg, who recently earned her master’s degree at Mizzou and is one of the resident composers for this year’s Festival, was featured in last week’s issue of Columbia’s VOX magazine.

* Mizzou’s Stefan Freund was on KBIA’s “Radio Friends with Paul Pepper” last week to talk about the Festival. You can listen to streaming audio of the program, or watch in the embedded video window below.

And while we’re on the subject of media coverage, composer and Mizzou graduate Patrick David Clark‘s recent trip to Iraq also got some notice from the press in his hometown of St. Louis.

Before Clark left to go teach high school students at American Voices‘ YES Academy in northern Iraq, he was interviewed by KSDK’s Art Holliday for the 4:00 p.m. newscast on the NBC affiliate. You can watch a clip of that interview here.

Clark also was interviewed before his departure by Nate Birt of Nate Birt of Clayton/Richmond Heights

When Clark returned to the USA last week, he did a follow-up interview with Holliday, which can be seen online here.

Summer Festival Spotlight: Charlie Piper

Completing the international contingent at this year’s Mizzou New Music Summer Festival is resident composer Charlie Piper, who’s from London, England. Born in 1982, Piper (pictured) completed his master’s degree with distinction at the Royal College of Music and currently is doing doctoral research at the Royal Academy of Music.

His awards include the 2006 Royal Philharmonic Society Composition Prize and the 2007 prize at the 13th International Young Composers Meeting in Apeldoorn. Piper also was a New Music Associate at Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge from 2008 to 2010.

Piper’s music has been has been broadcast on BBC Radio 3 and performed at the Cheltenham, Huddersfield, Gaudeamus, Bang-On-A-Can and Aix-en-Provence Festivals, the Barbican Hall, the South Bank Centre, the Roundhouse, The Wigmore Hall, King’s Place and Le Grand Théâtre de Provence. Performers have included the London Symphony Orchestra, Britten Sinfonia, the London Sinfonietta, Sentieri Selvaggi, The Esbjerg Ensemble, the Orkest ‘de ereprijs’, CHROMA, the English National Ballet and individuals such as Rolf Hind, Brindley Sherratt, Xian Zhang, Laurence Cummings, François-Xavier Roth, Martyn Brabbins, Yan Pascal Tortelier and Pierre-André Valade.

His recent work has included premieres in New York and Milan; a short residency in Gotland, Sweden; three performances of The Twittering Machine by L’orchestre des jeunes de la Méditerranée; and the premieres of Insomniac, commissioned by the London Sinfonietta, and Borderland, commissioned by Britten Sinfonia and taken on tour to Brighton, Cambridge, Norwich and The Wigmore Hall.

Earlier this year, Piper was appointed associate composer for Music in the Round in Sheffield, for which he will work closely with the organization’s resident musicians Ensemble 360, composing at least one 12-15 minute piece per year, plus additional short works. Piper’s first composition for Music in the Round will premiere this fall, and as he continues with the organization, he also will give talks, participate in question and answer sessions, and run workshops and open rehearsals.

You can read a short interview with Charlie Piper about his recent work Insomniac here, and hear the piece in the embedded audio player below. Also, there are more samples of Piper’s music on his website.

Charlie Piper’s Insomniac, performed by the London Sinfonietta with conductor Martyn Brabbins

Summer Festival Spotlight: Stylianos Dimou

A native of Greece, resident composer Stylianos Dimou is helping to bring a bit of international perspective to the 2012 Mizzou New Music Summer Festival.

Dimou (pictured) has been studying music in the USA since last year, working toward an MA in composition with Professor Carlos Sanchez-Gutierrez at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, NY. He also was the recipient of a Fulbright scholarship for the 2011-12 academic year.

Born in Thessaloniki, Greece, Dimou started his music studies at the Municipal Conservatory of Thessaloniki, where he earned degrees in music harmony in May, 2005 and counterpoint in May, 2008, plus a diploma in accordion in June, 2010. He began studying composition in 2006 at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki’s department of music studies, and graduated in 2011 with a Master of Music degree in composition.

Most of his works to date have been presented in workshops and competitions in Greece and elsewhere abroad. He has collaborated with Greek musical organizations such as the dissonArt ensemble, the Greek Ensemble of Contemporary Music, Idee Fixe, and Orpheus Soloists (GR), as well as with ALEA III here in the USA, and others.

In April, Dimou’s piece Réflexions de nuages was performed by the Jenaer Philharmonic Orchestra and flute player Carin Levine at the Weimarer Spring Festival for Contemporary Music in Germany. Earlier this year, he also was one of the co-creators of “Room For Five,” a joint work devised with three other Eastman composers and visual artist Anna Schuleit for the 2012 Benson Forum on Creativity.

Dimou will have company from some fellow Eastmanites at the Mizzou New Music Summer Festival, as resident composer David Crowell, MU’s Stefan Freund, and many of the members of resident ensemble Alarm Will Sound are Eastman alums, and resident composer Ted Goldman is an assistant professor there. It will also give him a chance to renew his acquaintance with guest composer Steven Stucky, with whom he took a master class in composition last year.

You can hear samples of Stylianos Dimou’s music in the embedded player below.

Summer Festival Spotlight: Ted Goldman

Ted Goldman

Coming from the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, NY, Ted Goldman should see at least a few familiar faces when he arrives in Columbia to serve as one of the resident composers for the 2012 Mizzou New Music Summer Festival. That’s because a number of participants in this year’s Festival have connections to Eastman, starting with MU’s Stefan Freund and most of the other members of Alarm Will Sound, who originally met while studying music at the famed conservatory in upstate New York.

Goldman (pictured), who’s an assistant professor of music theory at Eastman, also shares the conservatory connection with two of his fellow resident composers this year. David Crowell, profiled last week on this blog, is a graduate of Eastman, and Stylianos Dimou, who will be featured in this space tomorrow, currently is studying there for his master’s degree in composition.

Goldman’s compositions have received national and international recognition, including two ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Awards; the Society for New Music’s Brian M. Israel Prize; the Hanson Young Composers Award, and many other awards. In addition to writing a new piece for Alarm Will Sound to perform at this year’s MNMSF, Goldman has been commissioned by the Banff Centre in Canada, The Norfolk New Music Festival, the Contrasts Quartet, and twice by the New Juilliard Ensemble.

In 2011, he traveled to Hong Kong for an event called “The Intimacy of Creativity – The Bright Sheng Partnership: Composers Meet Performers in Hong Kong,” where he was one of a group of participating composers that also included 2010 Mizzou New Music Summer Festival resident composer
Moon Young Ha.

A New York native, Goldman began his undergraduate studies in physics, and graduated summa cum laude with honors in music from Columbia University. Goldman then earned his MM and DMA in composition from The Juilliard School. For five years he was a radio host at WKCR-FM NY, and he also is active in the Music and Medicine Initiative, a collaboration between Juilliard and Cornell University. As a pianist, Goldman has performed at the Bowdoin International Music Festival, The Mannes International Keyboard Institute, and the Mannes Beethoven Institute. In addition to teaching at Eastman, Goldman has held positions as an adjunct lecturer at Hunter College and as a teaching fellow at Juilliard.

You can read a brief interview with Ted Goldman from 2011 here, and read more about him and his thoughts on music in his blog. In the embedded video windows below, you can see a presentation that Goldman gave about one of his scholarly interests, the music of Conlon Nancarrow. The third segment includes one of Goldman’s original compositions, written in Nancarrow’s style.

Ted Goldman on Conlon Nancarrow, part 1 – writing for player piano, and using ancient techniques (isorhythm) in modern music

Ted Goldman on Conlon Nancarrow, part 2 – More speed, more notes!, and recreating Nancarrow’s pianos, virtually

Ted Goldman on Conlon Nancarrow, part 3 – What Nancarrow would do if he had a sequencer, and an original composition in the style of Nancarrow

Summer Festival Spotlight: Asha Srinivasan

Born in Utah and brought up in India and the USA, Asha Srinivasan creates music that combines elements from two different cultures. An assistant professor of music at Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisconsin, Srinivasan (pictured) is one of eight resident composers for the 2012 Mizzou New Music Summer Festival.

She is part of an musical extended family – her mother Lalitha is a professional singer of Indian film songs – and began taking voice lessons at age 6, learning the classical music of Southern India. As a adult composer blending Indian Carnatic ragas with Western concepts of form and progression, Srinivasan has earned numerous honors and awards for her music, including winning the BMI Foundation’s first Annual Women’s New Music Commission Competition in 2006.

She has had electronic pieces performed at ICMC, June in Buffalo, SEAMUS, Spark, Electroacoustic Juke Joint, Electronic Music Midwest, and The Women in New Music Festival, and won commissions from the Flute/Cello Commissioning Circle, Sequoia Chamber Players, clarinetist E. Michael Richards and others. Her original electro-acoustic opera, The Fallen Nutcracker, was premiered by Landless Theatre Company in Washington, D.C for a run of sixteen performances in 2003.

More recently, Srinivasan’s 2007 composition “By the River Savathi” was selected for a performance at the prestigious Orchestra of St. Lukes’ “Notable Women Festival – a Celebration of Women Composers”. In 2011, her Carnatic-influenced “Dviraag,” an eight-minute work for flute and cello, was selected by a jury of four composers from China, Thailand and the United States to be performed and recorded at the 2011 Thailand International Composition Festival.

Srinivasan got her B.A. in music from Goucher College, and M.Mus. in computer music composition and M.Mus. in music theory pedagogy from the Peabody Conservatory. She then earned her D.M.A. in composition from University of Maryland, College Park. You can read more about (and by) her at Lawrence University’s composition blog, and hear two of her award-winning compositions in the embedded players below.

Asha Srinivasan’s Dviraag, as performed during the Thailand International Composition Festival 2011

Srinivasan’s Alone, Dancing, featuring flutist Laura Heinrichs, recorded March 2009 in Cambridge, MA. This composition won second prize in the Peabody Conservatory’s Prix d’Ete Competition in 2005.

Summer Festival Spotlight: Patrick Harlin

Resident composer Patrick Harlin comes to the 2012 Mizzou New Music Summer Festival from Ann Arbor, where he currently is working toward a doctoral degree in music composition from the University of Michigan.

Born in Salt Lake City and raised in Seattle, Harlin (pictured) has been composing and playing piano since age 8. He earned his undergraduate degree at Western Washington University, where he received the Ford Hill Piano Scholarship, the Western Washington Piano Department scholarship, and many other awards. Harlin then moved to Ann Arbor to study for his Master’s degree, which he completed last year.

Though classically trained, Harlin considers his love of jazz, electronic and modern music to be integral to his output as a composer. He also has a keen interest in acoustic ecology – the effect sound has on the environment – which has led to works that reflect natural processes and landscapes, formally and sonically.  He also recently guest lectured on acoustic ecology and the natural world at the University of Iowa.

In addition to his work as a composer and pianist, Harlin taught advanced aural skills to second year music majors at WWU, and has worked as a copyist and/or engraver for Samuel Adler, Michael Daugherty and Roger Briggs, including the engraving the piano reduction of Daugherty’s recent Grammy Award winning composition Deus ex Machina. He also maintains a private studio in Ann Arbor where he teaches music composition and piano to students of all ages and experience levels.

Also in Ann Arbor, Harlin recently won the Lightworks Film Festival award for best original score, and was featured in June on the news site In the embedded players below, you can hear some samples of Patrick Harlin’s music, and there’s more audio of his work available on his SoundCloud page.

Patrick Harlin’s Landscapes, Movement Two

Harlin performs the third part of his piece Three American Sketches in May 2008 at Western Washington University.

Summer Festival Spotlight: Brian Ciach

A skilled pianist as well as a composer, Brian Ciach has created a wide variety of original music, from solo piano pieces to orchestral works to electronic music. As one of the resident composers for the 2102 Mizzou New Music Summer Festival, Ciach (pronounced “SIGH-ack”) has written a new piece for Alarm Will Sound called The Einstein Slide.

Inspired by a slice of Albert Einstein’s brain displayed in the Mütter Museum in Ciach’s home town of Philadelphia, the new work is puckishly termed “an appendix” to Collective Uncommon: Seven Orchestral Studies on Medical Oddities, which Ciach wrote in 2011 for his doctoral dissertation in music composition at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music.

Ciach’s sly sensibilities also are on display in Blank Slate, another new work composed for the percussion quartet Square Peg Round Hole that is played entirely on “found” instruments and includes a movement called Vegetable Requiem.

An assistant professor of music theory and composition at Murray State University in Kentucky, Ciach (pictured) was selected earlier this year to be the first participant in the Subito Composer Fellowship program, developed in partnership with the Minnesota Orchestra Composer Institute.

His music has been performed across the United States and in Germany and Italy by ensembles including The Minnesota Orchestra, the Indiana University Concert Orchestra, the Indiana University New Music Ensemble, the Percussion Ensembles of Indiana University and the University of Buffalo, and others.

Before receiving his doctorate from Indiana in May of this year, Ciach earned his Master’s degrees in composition and piano performance at Temple University. He previously has taught music at West Chester University, Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, and Ball State University.

In the embedded video windows below, you can see and hear some examples of Brian Ciach’s music and watch do a presentation about Collective Uncommon.

Ciach performs his Two Berlin Preludes

Ciach’s A Quite Dream of a Place/Un posto da sogno (Venice), the first movement of his extended 2010 composition Road Trip. Recorded April 21, 2011 in Auer Hall at Indiana University by the Indiana University New Music Ensemble, directed by David Dzubay, and soprano Sharon Harms.

Ciach discusses Collective Uncommon

Summer Festival Spotlight: Anne-Carolyn Bird

The guest artist at this year’s Mizzou New Music Summer Festival will be the talented soprano Anne-Carolyn Bird. Bird (pictured) will perform with Alarm Will Sound as part of the concert on Thursday, July 26, helping to bring to life the first part of Donnacha Dennehy’s new work-in-progress, The Hunger.

Known primarily as an operatic singer, Bird got her undergraduate degree at the University of Georgia, then earned a Masters Degree cum laude from New England Conservatory, where she was a student of acclaimed mezzo-soprano D’Anna Fortunato. She has been a recipient of grants and awards from many organizations, and has twice been a Young Artist with the Santa Fe Opera Apprentice Program for Singers and twice a Fellow at the Tanglewood Music Center.

Bird first made her Metropolitan Opera debut in the 2006-2007 Season, singing two roles in a new production of Il Trittico, and has since returned as Barbarina in Le Nozze di Figaro, Najade in Ariadne auf Naxos, in Boris Godunov, and Don Carlo, among other productions. This year, she has appeared in Kepler and Pierrot Lunaire at the famed Spoleto Festival USA, and in the fall, she will return to the Met to sing Giannetta in the opening night gala production of Bartlett Sher’s new L’elisir d’amore.

Bird also is known in classical music circles for her blog The Concert, which for several years regularly chronicled her efforts to build her musical career. For more about Anne-Carolyn Bird, read this interview she did last year for the NYC Opera’s website. You also can learn more about her and hear some audio samples at her page on the site of her management firm.

In the embedded video window below, you can hear Bird singing an excerpt from Prima Donna, singer-songwriter Rufus Wainwright’s recent venture in opera.